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Changing pads on Wilwood SL

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  • Changing pads on Wilwood SL

    How does everyone get the pistons back in the caliper when putting in new pads?

    Thanks.
    Webb
    1988 Diamantschwarz
    2004 Jet Black

  • #2
    For lack of a better option, I use a pair of channel lock pliers with a rag over them to prevent them from marring the caliper and pistons. Works ok, but not ideal.

    There are companies that make a caliper piston spreading tools but they seem more expensive then they ought to be.
    http://eagleday.stores.yahoo.net/brmato.html
    http://www.amsperformance.com/cart/G...mance.com.html

    Another option is one of these, but they're really meant for single piston floating calipers
    http://www.zdmak.com/wbstore/main.as...CTMP=1&LowCt=0

    Let us know if you find a good option.

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    • #3
      do you compress each piston one at a time, or do you do one side of the caliper and then the other side?

      I just did it with a prybar (gently and carefully) and the old pads

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      • #4
        The small 1.12" pistons are easy to push by hand. The bigger 1.62" unit may require either a small pry bar, or the use of a small C-clamp. I use both methods depending on what's in my tool box.

        Do one side at a time. And check the fluid level in the reservoir...

        As preventive maintenance, when removing the pads, I sometimes just wipe the piston area with a towel or spray compressed air, and sometimes I unclip the stainless steel abutment pads and clean any possible dust stuck behind them. Those calipers are extremely easy to maintain.


        [email protected]

        1969 2002 racecar
        1989 M3 racecar
        e39 Touring

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        • #5
          On a side note: I read a very valuable tip either here or on the sig (forgot who's the source, sorry)
          Before you push the pistons back, open up the bleed screw so that the old 'heat cycled' fluid gets pushed out and replenished by 'non-heatcycled' fluid from further upstream. Finish off by topping up the reservoir.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hardtailer View Post
            On a side note: I read a very valuable tip either here or on the sig (forgot who's the source, sorry)
            Before you push the pistons back, open up the bleed screw so that the old 'heat cycled' fluid gets pushed out and replenished by 'non-heatcycled' fluid from further upstream. Finish off by topping up the reservoir.
            simple, but very effective! Thanks. [peace]


            Goodbye M3, you served me well.

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