Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ditched my E90 for an '88 DS

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Had our "baby Sigfest" today, 10 M3s (9 photographed, Ted was late). Really enjoyed myself, I love this community of owners!



    It's a good thing I don't care about my paint. Greasy donut snail trail





    So the other DS car here has a 2.5, cams, carbon box, and Alpha-N. I am embarrassed to say that I forgot the owner's name, which is pretty terrible because ten minutes after meeting for the first time he let me drive his car! Holy moly, what a sound... not to mention the extra power everywhere. He's got me pricing out an A-N setup... RIP wallet.



    The second highlight was getting a ride in Josh's incredible S38 swap. I think we spun wheels in first, second, third... it's a completely different car. It may only be 2 additional cylinders but it felt like 3 times the motor. Wow.



    The final highlight was the brainstorming and invaluable "here, drive my car" session that went on. Josh, Ted, and Jon led some brainstorming on my clutch issue and pretty quickly we were able to conclude that the pressure plate is not able to do its job. I checked the part numbers, it's all the right stuff... so what could it be? Well, if you recall, I had my OE flywheel machined down to match approximately the Evo weight. Reviewing the photos, we were able to see that the machinist took down the clutch contact surface without taking the pressure plate bolting surface down by the same amount. So whereas the contact surface is typically proud of the bolting surface by some small amount (hard to tell without part in hand, but maybe 2mm), mine was machined down and is now sub-flush by approximately the same amount. The springs on the pressure plate don't really ever get a chance to engage, so the pedal is limp.

    That's the working theory, and I just bought an Evo flywheel so it looks like we're going back in. The other thing I was finally able to confirm, based on Bill Arnold's guidance and the collective wisdom of the group today, is that my transmission is simply no bueno. If you have a known good one, let me know as I am interested in replacing mine.
    1988 Lachs - sold
    1988 DS - sold
    Bay Area M3 FB group

    Comment


    • Update: new Evo flywheel is on the way, and I have a purchase pending on a good used transmission. Woot.

      Oh right, Bill put my A/C back together and I enjoyed it for two days before it exploded. Can't be surprised - some o-ring or rubber gasket somewhere hadn't been pressurized for ??? years and was probably dry-rotted and not up to the task when the system was suddenly working again. :-(
      1988 Lachs - sold
      1988 DS - sold
      Bay Area M3 FB group

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Konig View Post
        Complete summary of final setup

        Starting point: OE suspension, completely refreshed

        Struts: Koni single-adjustable
        Front: 8641-1210SPORT
        Rear: 80-2522SP1
        Springs: Ground Control 2020.2020.01 coilover conversion kit
        Front: 375 lbs/in, GC 125.64.75
        Rear: 475 lbs/in, GC 140.64.83
        Camber plates: Ground Control Touring CCPE30TOURING

        Wheels/tires: BBS LM built by e30polak (Chris); Dunlop Direzza ZII Star Spec
        Front: 17x8.5 et23; 215/40R17
        Rear: 17x9 et25; 235/40R17
        Ride height: 61cm front, 62cm rear (ground to wheel arch)

        Notes: No fender rolling, no modifications to strut housing, no rubbing
        Such a great, useful read!! Thanks for posting all this brotha!

        Comment


        • Not much to report in M3 land. I've registered for Monterey car week - that is, Legends of the Autobahn on Friday and the Festorics corral at the racetrack Saturday and Sunday. Same routine as last year, surely it won't be as grand a production (not BMW's 100th birthday anymore) but apparently the E30 M3s will be in the spotlight for their 30th anniversary.

          No progress on my car. I won't be receiving my newused transmission for quite some time, probably after Monterey, which is a bummer. I'm sure it's just in my brain, now that I know better shifting is on the horizon, but the clutch feels worse than ever. I'm driving the Type R more and more.

          I did finally get a chance to hang up some of my big M3 posters I got from eBay Germany a while back. The hardest part of the whole thing was (1) realizing that they were A1 sized, and (2) buying A1-sized frames. I'm happy with the result. I have three others that were deemed "cool enough" to be hung inside the house, huzzah.



          Now to go off-topic for a bit, I hope you don't mind. This week was a rare treat at work, as I was able to drive not only a Model 3 for the first time but also two of our benchmark cars. The 3 I just got a very brief, straight stint but the Alfa and the Ford I had a bit more seat time. Here are my thoughts on those cars, please bear in mind that my newest and fastest car is my 2004 Miata so I'm out of touch with modern machinery.





          Alfa Romeo Quadrifoglio

          I was pumped to get an overnight reservation in the Quadriformaggio, it's one of the most exciting new cars on sale. To refresh you, it has a 2.9L twin-turbo Ferrari-designed (built?) V6 good for 505 horsepower. Transmission is an 8-speed automatic with flappy paddles. The first impression I got was one of intimidation and complexity - the enormous key fob stays in your pocket (remember, my cars are oooooold) and you start it via big red button on the steering wheel. On the console there's a bit rotary dial with D, N, A, and 'track' modes. It was in D, which I believe is Dynamic, and I left it there during my time with the car. In addition I had a damper toggle switch to tighten things up on the fly. I was put off by all these choices, maybe because I just had one day with the car, but I couldn't help think that I could have survived with just the damper mode to play with. Why you'd alter throttle response or shift speeds on your sports car, I have no idea. Tight and fast, please.

          Right from the start of my drive, I noticed some interesting features of the car. The B-pillar is quite far forward, for motivations unknown, and as a result the front doors are light and short. Setting out from a parking space, the transmission initially has zero creep when you've shifted into gear. Only after a touch of throttle does it begin creeping, and it does so at a surprisingly quick pace. This car has the carbon brakes, which are new to me, and the combination of a fast creep speed and cold ceramic brakes is a surprising lunge toward the car parked behind you. Yikes! "Beep," said the parking sensor. At the first stop, the car shut down. I found the auto start-stop button and turned that nonsense off.

          Moving through the parking lot, the visibility was good and the steering rack very quick. No more than 90 degrees of rotation called for, essentially through my entire day of driving. The brakes are a bit dull when cold but stop fine so long as you're aware of that constraint. The redline is a low 6500rpm, but there is a surge when the turbos come in and upshifts are quick. Arriving at the first bend, I am shocked at the amount of grip available. Shifts above 4000rpm or so yield bangs and pops from the turbos, and whooshing as revs build again in the next gear. While the motor is impressive, I can't get over how hard I'm able to turn in to these corners. The combination of tight fast steering and whatever witchcraft is at work in these tires means that the car is unchallenged by my inputs. I enter a cloverleaf as quickly as I dare, then just... turn the wheel more. The car doesn't care - the line tightens and I'm up against the door panel a little harder than just a moment ago. The feeling is exhilarating but I can't help but notice that the steering wheel isn't telling me much of anything about where the limit is. Am I close? 3/4 of the way there? Not even half? I have no clue (and I don't really want to find out on a company car).

          The driving experience has me laughing, but things aren't perfect. The throttle calibration leaves something to be desired. Charging through 2nd I pull the paddle and hit 3rd, just to hear the pops and bangs, and come off the throttle as I finish the shift. The software is confused, though, and the car jumps ahead of its own accord briefly. My best guess is that it's trying to help me out with a throttle input close to what I had before the shift, but the end result is a car that isn't really doing what I'm instructing. On the highway, I cruise in 8th until I want to get around a car. I pull the paddle three times quickly to hit 5th, but the Alfa has almost a full-second count between each downshift. 8... 7... 6... 5 finally appears. It's almost too late to the party!



          My short summary is that the car is fast, with incredible grip. At the same time, it's intimidating and I get the feeling that I don't actually know what it's doing underneath me. My coworkers and I all agree that we'd love to drive it for maybe a week, and then the novelty would wear off. I'd probably be arrested on day 3 anyway. Unfortunately I don't even get a chance to get arrested, because 80 miles into driving the car it stalls out at parking lot speeds and shuts down. "Service electronic throttle control." It won't restart. 8000 miles on the car, and it has to be towed to the dealer. I guess I got the real Italian car experience!





          Ford Focus RS

          It's funny to drive these cars in succession, because while they do not compete in the market and have likely never been mentioned in the same sentence, they could be distant cousins. The RS has a 2.0L turbo 4 that, based on my view of the gauge, boosts to about 20psi to put out 350 horsepower. Thankfully this car has a clutch. A clutch that takes up straight off the floor, I discover as I jump in and immediately stall. No worries, with my foot back on the clutch, by the time I find the starter button I realize that the motor is already idling again. Thanks Ford for making things a bit smoother! There are people who say, "it's $43k for a Focus!!" Those people are right. The interior is not much different from what you get in your Hertz focus, and there's a lot of sad black plastic going on. I can forgive it though, because the front seats are killer. Deep bolsters and alcantara and blue stitching!

          Despite a rough start, the clutch is nice to work with and the shifter as well. The car is surprisingly quiet from the driver's seat, even under full acceleration (again, compared to my cars). There is turbo lag, with the boost coming in around the 3000rpm mark, but I don't mind it. I'm of the opinion that the delayed spool of the turbo is part of the charm. Like the Alfa, there are pops and bangs after a high-RPM upshift as well as on rev-matched downshifts. These pops and bangs sound more like they're exhaust-based; the Alfa's were more turbo-wastegate-y. Whatever the source, they're addictive and I every small straight is an excuse to bring them out to confuse bystanders and passing traffic.

          Like the Alfa, my impression here is that the steering is super-fast and the grip is well beyond what my cars offer. This car doesn't break, so I take it to a tight and challenging road at night (Page Mill for those who know the area). My impression after that drive could be summarized so: if someone told me that I had to get up a road I'd never seen before as fast as possible, I would take this car. I don't know that anything could beat it. My drive went something like this: slap it in second gear; bomb into a corner - left, right, off-camber, blind, broken pavement, it doesn't matter - stab the brakes if needed to get speed in the right place; turn in with the super-quick rack and huge grip from the tires; floor it and let the car carry you out, popping and banging all the way. The chassis, the diffs, the dampers, the brakes, they all worked together in such a way that the road surface simply didn't matter. In most cars I've experienced, stabbing the brakes as you come into a surprise off-camber U-turn on broken pavement would invoke ABS, or at least unsettle the car. In the RS, the speed disappeared and the car tracked exactly where I pointed it. It simply did not care. Extremely impressive.

          I vastly preferred the RS to the Alfa, not just because it didn't break down, but because it was simply more enjoyable to drive. A clutch and shifter were so rewarding to work with after the Alfa's confusing transmission logic. The RS is slower, but it's still way more than enough for real-life duties and on the hills it can hang. On the backroads it was a roller coaster under my control - point and shoot, and frankly very easy to drive very quickly. It still felt like there was a layer of rubber between me and what was going on with the rest of the car. The clutch seemed to smooth out not-great shifts, the throttle seemed to hang a bit to help you out with a rev-match (though it was definitely not auto rev-matching); the steering had more feel than the Alfa but still didn't tell me everything. It was also too quiet, damn that NVH padding! I think that's what's changed in the 20 years since my Type-R and the 30 years since the M3, the cars have improved in efficiency and comfort but the feedback to the driver has been chipped away little by little. My cars ask more of the driver and call for more patience and precision in the inputs. To be fair to the RS, my baseline is one of the best driver's cars ever and the best-handling FWD car ever. I came away thoroughly impressed and, if I were to buy a brand new car, the RS is on the very short list of cars I'd consider (Civic Type-R, M2, RS, ND Miata, Corvette Grand Sport...).

          That turned out far longer than expected, but hopefully you enjoy the read. It was fun to compare my experience to those of the fancy motoring journalists, I was relieved to find that my impressions were largely aligned with theirs and my internal calibration is not way off! Now, to ask about the ATS-V in our benchmark fleet...

          TL;DR: Alfa fun for a week, then novelty would wear off (or I'd get arrested). RS super impressive and quite possibly the fastest way up a hill. Both are new and modern and isolate the driver compared to our ancient cars.
          1988 Lachs - sold
          1988 DS - sold
          Bay Area M3 FB group

          Comment


          • thanks for sharing! Love the steering wheel.
            @slowprogress

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Konig View Post
              Rafal (cleanE30), the previous owner of my car, came out in his beautiful M3 vert tribute. A perfect day for top-down cruising.

              I'd love more information on this vert tribute. It looks incredible. Specs? What motor?
              '88 BMW M3 Henna/Black - Project Thread
              '87 Saab Airflow convertible - 335whp/330ft-lbs March 2010 Eurotuner Magazine Feature Car

              Comment


              • Great car, great read. Quick question about your GC suspension set up. I'm going through the same issue of not quite having the perfect front drop I want. I also have not been wanting to modify my housings so after installing the GC conversion kit I added the hybrid camber plates. It's sitting better but I would love a little more drop to get things tighter. Seeing your post I sent an email to GC asking about purchasing the 5" springs in my rate (450). Do u mind letting me know your measurements ground to fender so I can have an idea of how I am currently sitting. I only saw your measurements with the 17" wheels. I'm running the same size tires on 16" BBS RS wheels. Also are u having any bottoming out issues? Thanks so much.
                '89 M3
                '11 1M
                '12 MINI JCW
                '89 325i (Chumpcar)
                www.electricpixel.ca

                Comment


                • Konig
                  Konig commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes, let me measure and get back to you in a day or two...

                • djafactor
                  djafactor commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Cheers, just measured mine for a comparison:

                  Front: 61.5cm (lowest sleeve setting)
                  Rear: 59.5cm (about 2cm from the lowest sleeve setting)

                  Struts are the same part numbers as yours but i'm running more aggressive spring rates of 440/650 front/rear plus the GC SCCA Street Hybrid Camber/Caster plates (ccpe30SP-1)

                • djafactor
                  djafactor commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hi, wanted to check in to see if u had a chance to remeasure your car? Installed the 5" springs tonight and was wondering how your setup compared to mine. Cheers

              • Received my packet for Monterey weekend, it's on the horizon! Will be driving the M3 down and back (1.5 hours each way) Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. If you're planning to drive down from the bay area let me know and perhaps we can work out a caravan.

                M3 has been on the back burner whilst I focus on launching a different kind of M3 at work. My wife and I will be putting our order in shortly (though not in white).



                1988 Lachs - sold
                1988 DS - sold
                Bay Area M3 FB group

                Comment


                • Love your thread and it's updates.

                  I used to have a 01 type r, got it new and unfortunately sold it after 5 years. It was a great experience that I will never forget though. It was the gateway drug into cars.

                  Comment


                  • Great thread Konig. Thanks


                    Disclaimer: Remember, I know absolutely nothing, but it doesn't prevent me from having an opinion or suggestion. :

                    Comment


                    • Some snaps of my car from Legends this year. Fitted the LMs again, which made the ride to Monterey painful, but it sure looks good.









                      1988 Lachs - sold
                      1988 DS - sold
                      Bay Area M3 FB group

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Konig View Post
                        Received my packet for Monterey weekend, it's on the horizon! Will be driving the M3 down and back (1.5 hours each way) Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. If you're planning to drive down from the bay area let me know and perhaps we can work out a caravan.

                        M3 has been on the back burner whilst I focus on launching a different kind of M3 at work. My wife and I will be putting our order in shortly (though not in white).



                        Beautiful, this is the exact configuration I'm ordering (day 1 reservation holder here!)


                        I'm sure you can't say much, but... how is it?!!!
                        '88 BMW M3 Henna/Black - Project Thread
                        '87 Saab Airflow convertible - 335whp/330ft-lbs March 2010 Eurotuner Magazine Feature Car

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by IronJoe View Post

                          Beautiful, this is the exact configuration I'm ordering (day 1 reservation holder here!)


                          I'm sure you can't say much, but... how is it?!!!
                          We haven't yet received ours, and my driving impressions were brief (5 mins or so), but I think you're going to like it! I don't believe I'm allowed to say much beyond that, unfortunately. If you have driven a Model S, it feels like a smaller version with all of the positive Tesla driving characteristics. Once we receive ours, you're welcome to come drive it if you're in the Bay Area. I am excited to soon take a his-n-hers M3/M3 photo.

                          Oh right - we're going blue with aero wheels.
                          1988 Lachs - sold
                          1988 DS - sold
                          Bay Area M3 FB group

                          Comment


                          • Rented some different lenses for my Nikon this weekend to shoot the Weathertech-way-too-long-name Grand Prix at Laguna Seca. Did a few practice shots at home first.

                            Still exploring all options for transmission rebuild or replacement.







                            1988 Lachs - sold
                            1988 DS - sold
                            Bay Area M3 FB group

                            Comment


                            • AlpineM3
                              AlpineM3 commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Is that an ITR next to the DS?

                            • Konig
                              Konig commented
                              Editing a comment
                              AlpineM3 it sure is.

                          • Transmission shouldn't be too tough to replace right? Didn't the E30 M3 share a transmission with one or more e28 variants? (Not an expert here but I recall reading this)
                            '88 BMW M3 Henna/Black - Project Thread
                            '87 Saab Airflow convertible - 335whp/330ft-lbs March 2010 Eurotuner Magazine Feature Car

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X