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Ditched my E90 for an '88 DS

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  • #31
    You are doing some good work there.
    Car looks great and is looking better in every photo.
    Nice work
    jimmy p.
    87 E30 M3 Prodrive British Touring Car
    88 E30 M3 Zinnoberot - Street
    88 E30 M3 Lachsilber - Race (#98 SCCA SPU)
    92 E30 M Technic Cabrio - S14 POWERED!
    98 318Ti M44, Base - Morea Green
    04 Ford F350 - V10

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    • #32
      Made small progress today - plenum and air horns were reunited, and I got the new gaskets bolted up to the throttle bodies. Replaced the anti-tamper caps as well... yellow is out, blue is in.



      The gating items for re-assembly are the injectors, which probably won't return from service until Wednesday of next week. In the meantime I am attempting to replace the throttle cable, as the plastic body at the grommets has cracked apart. Any tips or tricks for pushing that stupid clip through the firewall from inside the cabin?
      1988 Lachs - sold
      1988 DS - sold
      Bay Area M3 FB group

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      • #33
        I successfully installed my new throttle cable this week. The key to removing the old cable was, in my case, a destructive approach. From the cabin side, I aimed a long philips-head screwdriver into the center thru-hole of the plastic clip and cracked it with a hammer. This busted the clip enough to remove the assembly and get the new one in place. I threw in a new rubber bushing between the cable and the pedal linkage while I was at it.

        On the throttle body side of things, I had an old and cracked coolant elbow so I swapped in new rubber. I applied sealant to my Turner supplementary gaskets and bolted the throttle bodies back in to place. My injectors should return from MEPEH refurb tomorrow, at that point I can begin re-assembly. In the meantime, I did some other prep work.



        The original plenum mount (left) was tweaked and one end of the stud was much longer than the other. I ordered a new piece from the dealer and found that the new one is shorter and a bit narrower. Perhaps the one that was in there previously was not original - that would explain why I was having a hard time pulling the plenum earlier.



        I applied sealant to some vacuum fittings that didn't appear to be sealing well anymore. This is the front of the plenum (this fitting just kind of fell out when I first removed the plenum).

        I also found time to replace the RH wiper grommet, swap in new tail lamp bulbs, replace my crusty e-brake boot, and remove the crappy tint that came on the car. After reading up on DIY tint removal techniques I purchased a clothing steamer and, feeling kind of silly, took it out to the garage. I have to say, it worked flawlessly. I don't know how old the tint is, but I kept the glass steamy and just peeled the old tint off with my nails in large sections. The rear glass came off in one large sheet with no glue reside and no damage to the defroster lines. I definitely recommend that approach, and as a bonus I now own a steamer.

        I pulled the radio that came with the car out and plan to install the stock Alpine piece I bought. Of course the Alpine unit receives weird pin-spade connectors... I believe they are called "DIN" style. Does anyone have a lead on where I can buy that style of connector? You know it's bad when the guys at Fry's say, "I've never seen that before..." And finally, a photo of the finished 1:10 replica.



        More updates to follow as the car comes back together!
        1988 Lachs - sold
        1988 DS - sold
        Bay Area M3 FB group

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        • #34
          Injectors returned today. According to MEPEH's report my injector filters weren't up to the correct flow spec.



          With the injectors back in hand, I was able to start putting everything back together. The car has been sitting for nearly 3 weeks.



          The reassembly process went smoothly, except that the brake booster vacuum fitting on the intake manifold was angled straight at the fuel lines and I had to break it loose and re-seal it. You can see it in post #32 - it should instead point straight toward the rear of the car.



          There's the finished product! I am pretty pleased to report that it fired right up and seems to have smoother power delivery. The idle is even - it doesn't hunt around anymore - but it's ~1200 rpm cold and warm. With the ICV measured in spec, I'm not sure what else it could be. Advice is appreciated!

          Next on the agenda is probably to finish my head unit install, since it currently looks like someone broke into my car and stole the stereo. After that I'll do a brake flush and install speed bleeders. But for now... I just want to drive it again!
          1988 Lachs - sold
          1988 DS - sold
          Bay Area M3 FB group

          Comment


          • #35
            Looks great, I'd like to do the intake manifold gaskets/throttle body o-rings and injector rebuild on my car in the near future. Do you have a good writeup that you were following?

            P.S. - I love the DS, even before I became biased ;-)

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            • #36
              Originally posted by ItsNotTheNissan View Post
              Looks great, I'd like to do the intake manifold gaskets/throttle body o-rings and injector rebuild on my car in the near future. Do you have a good writeup that you were following?

              P.S. - I love the DS, even before I became biased ;-)
              Thanks! I found this fantastic page:

              http://da3rx.com/vares/BMW%20E30%20M...nual/index.htm

              The TB gasket job specifically:
              http://da3rx.com/vares/BMW%20E30%20M...em/1354030.htm

              Tons of how-tos with photos. I used it as my guide on this project and didn't have any issues. Feel free to ping me with any questions since it's fresh in my mind!
              1988 Lachs - sold
              1988 DS - sold
              Bay Area M3 FB group

              Comment


              • #37
                I've been neglecting the M3 for the past week or so; I've been focused on my 2002. I have something pretty cool in the cards for that car that I'll share in a few weeks.

                I did receive a nice package from Germany this week. Evo 3 front splitter setup, but with a carbon lip rather than the OEM piece. Should match nicely with the Evo 3 wing with carbon flap when I eventually get that painted and fitted!



                1988 Lachs - sold
                1988 DS - sold
                Bay Area M3 FB group

                Comment


                • #38
                  Looking for some guidance here - I still have high idle after re-sealing the intake and verifying that the ICV is in-spec. Idle is steady and approximately 1200, and the car starts and runs fine. Where can I begin my troubleshooting?
                  1988 Lachs - sold
                  1988 DS - sold
                  Bay Area M3 FB group

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Hi,

                    The two places I would first start at are:
                    1, Engine not running listen carefully at the throttle position switch and slowly move the throttle linkage should hear a click as it moves away from idle position, then remove the plug (only 3 wires) connect in ohms meter to switch and repeat should see continuity with a low amount of resistance at idle and open circuit just off idle . Sorry I don’t have figures or more detail at this stage.
                    Usually when the switch goes the problem of high idle will be intermittent.

                    2, With the hood open engine not running key in position 2 should hear faint humm/buzz from the ICV under the inlet manifold if you can not hear noise touch it with a long screwdriver etc to feel the vibration.
                    If it does not work most likely problem is the two transistors inside the DME require replacing.

                    Fix #1 fist before #2, I am not sure if the ICV works when the engine is not in the idle position.

                    I hope you have checked the 4 idle bypass screws under the tamperproof covers are at 3/4 to 1 turn from fully bottomed out and your brake booster elbow connection in the inlet manifold are secure.
                    Dave

                    E30 M3 1987
                    Mini Clubman GT
                    BMW E36 323 Msport
                    Toyota Corona
                    KTM 200EXC
                    Honda CB50 (1979)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Dave @nz View Post
                      Hi,

                      The two places I would first start at are:
                      1, Engine not running listen carefully at the throttle position switch and slowly move the throttle linkage should hear a click as it moves away from idle position, then remove the plug (only 3 wires) connect in ohms meter to switch and repeat should see continuity with a low amount of resistance at idle and open circuit just off idle . Sorry I donít have figures or more detail at this stage.
                      Usually when the switch goes the problem of high idle will be intermittent.

                      2, With the hood open engine not running key in position 2 should hear faint humm/buzz from the ICV under the inlet manifold if you can not hear noise touch it with a long screwdriver etc to feel the vibration.
                      If it does not work most likely problem is the two transistors inside the DME require replacing.

                      Fix #1 fist before #2, I am not sure if the ICV works when the engine is not in the idle position.

                      I hope you have checked the 4 idle bypass screws under the tamperproof covers are at 3/4 to 1 turn from fully bottomed out and your brake booster elbow connection in the inlet manifold are secure.
                      Dave
                      Thanks for the suggestions Dave. Newbie question, but where is the throttle position switch located? When I move the linkage I get an immediate click like you describe from the module just ahead of the wheel well - I suspect it is the cruise control box.

                      Regarding note 2, the ICV is making sound as described. Is transistor replacement a DIY task or do I need to seek out a new ECU?

                      Finally, the idle bypass screws - I didn't touch them during my intake work. Is there any reason that they would have been adjusted in the past? The tamper-proof caps did not show signs of tampering, and did look to be original to the car.
                      1988 Lachs - sold
                      1988 DS - sold
                      Bay Area M3 FB group

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Hi,
                        If the ICV is buzzing it is good and the transistors are good and replacing them is a diy job you can search the forum for info on those.

                        Idle switch on the front of the inlet manifold, I am not sure about the click at the cruse control box but there should be one from the throttle position switch TPS. To confirm it is working as it should you can disconnect the plug and bridge two terminals 2 & 18 in the plug this give the edu idle signal then start it should idle correctly if it is still idling high the TPS is not the problem.

                        Bear in mind this is not a five minute job there is a process to go through for synchronising the throttles and usually requires starting from the start.

                        http://m3guru.bmwe30m3.net/wp-conten...tem_img_58.jpg
                        http://m3guru.bmwe30m3.net/bmw-e30-m...stem-and-lines

                        http://s14net.vbulletin.net/forum/s1...her-idle-issue

                        http://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E30-M3-S14_2.3L/ES34288/
                        http://home.insightbb.com/~todd.kenyon/throttle.htm

                        E30 M3 1987
                        Mini Clubman GT
                        BMW E36 323 Msport
                        Toyota Corona
                        KTM 200EXC
                        Honda CB50 (1979)

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Thanks again Dave. I did some searching (as I should have the first time) and found many posts where you helped others with these same questions. I really appreciate your assistance.

                          Today I swapped out the Depo smoked smileys that came with the car for some Hellas. I'm not happy with the condition of either set of lamps so they will not be a permanent fitting. The Depo driver side low beam already has condensation... boo. I'm still undecided on whether to get brand new US ellipsoids or new smileys for ~$200 more.





                          Tomorrow there will be a gathering of Bay Area E30Ms, which I am really looking forward to. After that, I will either attempt to finish wiring my stereo, rebuild my shifter linkage, or both!
                          1988 Lachs - sold
                          1988 DS - sold
                          Bay Area M3 FB group

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Had a fantastic gathering this morning with 6 local owners. It was great to bounce ideas off of each other and share tips. It was also a valuable opportunity to compare the things that are difficult to discuss online, such as "is my clutch supposed to feel this stiff?" and "is that noise normal?"







                            To cap it off, three of us went for a drive out to the coast via twisty roads. The driving gods smiled on us and kept traffic out of our way. I used the meetup as an opportunity to examine my TPS issue, and confirmed that my sensor was not clicking as it should. I checked my notes and saw that the sensor was replaced by the previous owner... sure enough, I loosened the top screw, rotated the thing not even 10 degrees, and it fired up right around ~800rpm. I have a hunch that my car's rich running and poor fuel economy were related to the sensor not working correctly, I'll observe and report back after a few days.

                            When I got home I put the car in the air and started with my shift linkage refurb project. I was really hoping that I would not need to remove the exhaust or driveshaft, but after some hours of cursing I hit a dead end and will need to get those components out of the way tomorrow. The exhaust bolts look quite rusty... I'm not excited about it.



                            I'm not sure what disintegrated up here, but this probably explains the crunchiness I've been getting trying to put the car in gear...





                            More to come tomorrow, wish me luck. I appreciate if anyone has a simpler method to replace parts 4 and 7 from the diagram below..

                            1988 Lachs - sold
                            1988 DS - sold
                            Bay Area M3 FB group

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Hi,
                              Good to hear you have had a win with the high idle issue, if it is still running rich start the process with replacing the oxygen sensor and blue DME water temp sensor (unless they have been replaced in the last 25 years) then tune it from there.
                              Dave.
                              PS, I like the photos in your posts and good to see other M3s on the road.

                              E30 M3 1987
                              Mini Clubman GT
                              BMW E36 323 Msport
                              Toyota Corona
                              KTM 200EXC
                              Honda CB50 (1979)

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Well, the shifter ordeal has really turned into... an ordeal. I think the root cause was a failure on my part to understand the scope of work before starting the project. The reading I did on forums indicated that you COULD rebuild everything without lowering the exhaust and driveshaft, but that it was recommended to get that stuff out of the way. I don't have the tools in my garage to do that, so I started with hand tools and hoped for the best. In the end, I succeeded only in removing the selector rod and rendering the car un-driveable.

                                I had to have the car towed to a shop, which took a few days while I waited for an opening in their schedule, and they finally got the car re-assembled last night. I picked up the car this morning and they told me that the old parts were in the footwell, in the box I provided. I drove off to work and found that the shift action, while much improved, still didn't feel great. When I parked at the office I looked through my box of parts and, to my dismay, saw the two delrin bushings I had provided to replace part #4 in the diagram in post 43.

                                I called the shop and they've told me to bring it in to get it corrected. They're a good shop so it will be taken care of, but that's going to cost me a couple hours of getting rides to/from the shop etc. Lesson learned: when in doubt, book a DIY shop at $30/hour and do the job with the right tools. Instead, it cost me nearly $300 for the tow and work, time away from work coordinating the tow and shop dropoff, and a week without the car.
                                1988 Lachs - sold
                                1988 DS - sold
                                Bay Area M3 FB group

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