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Mobil oil co. recommended oil for our cars is 0w40

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  • Mobil oil co. recommended oil for our cars is 0w40

    i went on mobil 1 web site and asked what oils my cars needed they responded with
    0w40 this was for my 1988 M3 and my 1988 944 turbo S funny how olis have chaged so fast i am confused now i also have 12 jugs/ cases of 15w50 red tops at home do i still use them?
    Last edited by evommm; 07-22-2009, 11:32 PM.

  • #2
    use elf or total (both the same company)

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    • #3
      amsoil!!!
      1 of 135 - Brilliant Red for 1991 Production!:o
      1967 - Pontiac Firebird Convert.
      2006 - VW Jetta TDI - 50 mpg!
      2006 - Mercedes 320 CDI
      2006 - Maserati GranSport LE Rosso Modiale (New King Of the Garage)
      _______________________________________
      My Motto/Mantra for life - Giggity Giggity Goo - Glenn Quagmire

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      • #4
        Opinions on engine oil are all over the map. I just wish that someone who really knows what he/she is talking about will just tell us what is the best oil to use. The problem is that everyone , myself included, has a prejudice concerning engine oil.
        Of course, this is nothing new. I am old enough to remember the air cooled VW and Porsche gurus who would use nothing else besides "straight 30 weight" oil in their engines. They were highly suspicious of multigrade oils.

        Several years ago, I took my air cooled Porsche to a dealer for some service and was told that the Porsche factory now recommends synthetic 0w-40 for all models new or old, water cooled or air cooled. Since Porsche does not manufacture oil, I cannot come up with a reason, other than they are correct, to recommended this oil for their older models. What incentive does the factory have to mislead us?

        What incentive does Mobil have to mislead us? After all, they sell all types of oil including the 15w-50 that some of us swear by. Certainly, Mobil cannot be accused of just trying to get the maximum gas mileage out of our cars as some manufacturers have been accused of when they recommended a super light oil(5w-20, 5w-30 or 0w-40). Why would Mobil care about that? If anything, they would want us to use more gas.

        Of course, we have all heard from those who have many cases of Castrol GTX 20w-50 in his/her garage and how they have a gazillion miles on the M3 with no rebuild after using this oil from day one. Of course, this experience may be due more to how many fewer beers the engine assembler at the BMW factory had the night before he/she did the final assembly on the engine than the oil choice.

        Personally, I am willing to follow the recommendations of Mobil or Porsche or BMW on the oil choice. I do not believe that Oliver Stone will be making a movie anytime soon about how the bean counters at these companies sit around and intentionally(or recklessly) make recommendations on engine oil in order to cause us harm.
        Last edited by mark1996; 07-23-2009, 03:05 AM. Reason: typo

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        • #5
          If you search you'll find a huge thread about this.

          My short take on this:
          Determine what "second" number is appropriate for your car (probably 40 or 50 for our cars)
          Then get that weight oil with the lowest "first" number you can find (with todays technology probably a 0).

          There is no advantage to a 15-50 over a 0-50 except having less additives(which can break down). And since most of us s14 owners probably change our oil at 3k miles(or shorter) intervals...additive breakdown isnt an issue.

          So yes...0-40 or 0-50 is the way to go.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mark1996 View Post
            Several years ago, I took my air cooled Porsche to a dealer for some service and was told that the Porsche factory now recommends synthetic 0w-40 for all models new or old, water cooled or air cooled. Since Porsche does not manufacture oil, I cannot come up with a reason, other than they are correct, to recommended this oil for their older models. What incentive does the factory have to mislead us?
            Porsche has no incentive(that I know of) other than technology has changed. and 0-40 wasnt really an option before. Now you can have that 40weight oil at hot temps and a "zero" weight oil at "cold" temps....best of both worlds.

            BMW did the same with the e39 M5 oil recommendations.

            IMHO Every car will eventually be recommended with a "Zero" oil or should be...if its not, its bc they are trying to get 12k mile oil change intervals. Which is stupid anyway. :borg:

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            • #7
              Car manufacturers test the cars in this case the motor with certain oils the fact is that the government, EPA, CARB, etc. change the smog requirements for the companies. So the oil that was tested and worked and available, no longer applies... It is inconceivable that companies are going to test their new blends on every car make to ensure it holds up to the previous standards, just that in theory the new oil will. Motors on engine stand dynos don't always perform the same on the road under differing loads. I remember Porsche reccomended Mobil 1 With the sticker posted in every car, then bet. 2002-5 a lot of motors began failing...

              In short there will always be differing reports on what's best. The truth is, by law even if they do have a proprietary blend that mimics now banned compounds they could advertise it as such... My suggestion, buy new old stock syntetic oil pre-2001. Amsoil was the pioneer in the synthetic field so one can only hope they reinvested in R&D and kept ahead of the curve.
              Last edited by ///schwartzman; 07-23-2009, 03:42 AM.
              Rich!

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              • #8
                The oil needs to be for specific for cars that have mechanical valves i.e. TWS 10-60


                Originally posted by drinaldis
                I dated a girl who used to do the reverse grind. I kinda liked it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jeremiah View Post
                  The oil needs to be for specific for cars that have mechanical valves i.e. TWS 10-60
                  I'm not sure I agree with that statement. :blues:

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                  • #10
                    I used to use Mobil 15w50 in my E30 M3, but then they went to a different color packaging and there was lot of uncertainty about whether or not the formula had also changed...

                    ... so after some further research, it seems that you just can't go wrong with Redline 15w50. It has a known ZDDP content level, which is appropriate and of sufficient quantity for our S14's - and it performs very well at high temps (extended summer driving, track driving, etc). My car is also doesn't seem to leak any of this Redline oil, no visible or apparent seepage, etc. It might start very slightly easier with a lighter weight oil, but it's not hard to start by any means with the 15w50.

                    Yeah, the Redline costs very slightly more, but what's another $5-10 for an oil change? I look at it as the standard cost of ownership for a car of this caliber.

                    I have an E46 M3 also, which runs the Castrol Syntec 10w60 --- I thought about using that oil in my S14's, but I decided to stay with the Redline because of the known ZDDP content. I also never drive my M3's in cold weather (because I don't want to subject them to salt, sand, road chemical), so I don't have a need for oil with a thinner viscosity at low temps. And besides, those thinner oils will very likely result in more seepage from your motor, which I am not a fan of...
                    -AJ

                    -'88 Henna Red-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Low Level View Post
                      I also never drive my M3's in cold weather (because I don't want to subject them to salt, sand, road chemical), so I don't have a need for oil with a thinner viscosity at low temps. And besides, those thinner oils will very likely result in more seepage from your motor, which I am not a fan of...
                      "cold" is a relative term.

                      Your motor isnt up to the second numbers viscosity until 160+ degrees.

                      So we all drive in "cold" weather.

                      And its not about ease of start...its about flow and protection until we reach 160+ degrees(or whatever that number is).

                      a 0-50 is not thinner than a 15-50 and should not result in seepage.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ADA///M View Post
                        "cold" is a relative term.

                        Your motor isnt up to the second numbers viscosity until 160+ degrees.

                        So we all drive in "cold" weather.

                        And its not about ease of start...its about flow and protection until we reach 160+ degrees(or whatever that number is).

                        a 0-50 is not thinner than a 15-50 and should not result in seepage.


                        Yet when I asked "Which of your oil weights should I run?", Bimmerworld, Turner, and Redline themselves recommended 15w50 to me based on where I live and when + how I drive the car? I have to defer to that expertise, as it's certainly greater than my own.
                        -AJ

                        -'88 Henna Red-

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ///schwartzman View Post
                          I remember Porsche reccomended Mobil 1 With the sticker posted in every car, then bet. 2002-5 a lot of motors began failing...
                          I personally stopped using Mobil1 in my S14, but I still think it's a good quality oil.

                          This particular issue you mention with Porsche I believe is actually an engineering issue on Porsche's part, not a failure caused by a particular oil. If you Google "Porsche intermediate shaft failure", you'll see that there are a number of the water-cooled Porsche engines that are failing due to a design issue.

                          I always loved air-cooled Porsche's - they should never have gone to water-pumpers
                          -AJ

                          -'88 Henna Red-

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Low Level View Post
                            Yet when I asked "Which of your oil weights should I run?", Bimmerworld, Turner, and Redline themselves recommended 15w50 to me based on where I live and when + how I drive the car? I have to defer to that expertise, as it's certainly greater than my own.
                            Greater than your own does not mean its right or the best.

                            IMHO they are most likely recommending whats the "standard" or what has been the standard for our cars for many years(at least in Bimmerworld or Turner's case)

                            Maybe Redline only makes a 15w-50 and not a 0 or 10-50.

                            Im not saying we dont need a 50weight oil in our cars. Im just saying if you can get the same exact oil in 0-50 or 15-50....get it in 0-50. There's no benefit to the 15-50(except less additives)

                            ZDDP numbers are another story.
                            Last edited by ADA///M; 07-23-2009, 05:19 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Interesting this comes up. I was thinking of switching to eneos 0w50 made by nippon a japanese lubricant corp. This oil is used in japanese super gt cars so I figured It would be good enough for the s14. I sent them an email asking if they thought this oil would be safe to use and here is what they sent back.

                              "Thank you contacting us. We actually would not recommend our 0W-50 for an older vehicle such as yours. Main reason being that because of the nature of our fully synthetic oil, it might cause seal swell or even shrinkage due to the organic compound utilized in older engine components. With that said, if you have been using full synthetic oil and has no problem with it. You could try the 0W-50 and if your vehicle is a daily driver and not a full on track vehicle, a 5W-40. But you should definitely monitor it carefully.

                              In regards to the additive breakdown… You are absolutely correct. Conventional synthetic technology cannot create a 0W-50 range without having additives that will burn off immediately. That is the reason we are the only company capable of making a 0W-50 right now that meets the full API SM requirement. For an oil to obtain API approval, it must meet certain minimum standard of longevity. Our 0W-50 has the full API SM approval and thus the product does not breakdown prematurely within the normal change interval.

                              Even if you keep the oil in there for so long that the additive breaks down to the point where the viscosity changes, it will be from the hot end, where it might become something like a 0W-40. However, that doesn’t happen for quite a while.

                              Hopefully this answers your questions. Thank you again for your inquiry."


                              The last part of that response is very important because i think alot of people believe that a 0w50 will break down and behave like a 10w oil, but as you can see that is not true.

                              The main concern I see is oil getting past seals. Im not sure if i want to guinea pig and try the 0w50. they also didnt tell me the zddp and sulfur content in their oil. So im not sure if it has safe amounts.

                              another important note is that our engines require a certain level of zddp(zinc and phophate) and sulfur to properly lubricate the valvetrain. mobil 15w50 has around 1200ppm zddp- an adequate level. Redline also has enough of these additives. You need to be careful what oil you choose because the new API standard that was passed a few years ago significatly dropped the levels of these additives that can be put in todays oils. The reason being is that longer catalytic converter life was demanded.

                              lets not forget here that 0w50 is a totally new concept it is not until recently that this oil is even available so that shakes things up quite a bit.

                              all in all mobils 15w50 is a safe and time tested proven option.
                              Last edited by Dougy Fresh; 07-23-2009, 05:30 AM.

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