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RHD Engineering Flywheel

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  • RHD Engineering Flywheel

    Hello,

    Does anybody know or have an opinion on this flywheel ?
    It looks too cheap to be good.

    http://racehead.com.au/products-page...-flywheel-m10/

    Regards
    Bastien

  • #2
    That does seem really inexpensive....

    I know nothing specific about them....but I would wager they are machined in China....

    Comment


    • #3
      I inquired about it, and it does not have the timing reference pin required for the S14.
      .

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      • #4
        Still an attractive price and a VERY light weight. I wonder how streetable it is.

        88 M3 - LACHSSILBER/M TECH
        89 M3 - ALPINEWEISS II/SCHWARZ
        89 M3 - SEPANG BRONZE/SCHWARZ
        91 M TECHNIC TURBO - MACAOBLAU/M TECH


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        • #5
          Indeed, it's just not that expensive, also consider that it's a one piece machined wheel, instead of the multi-piece Alu flywheels that have the high price tags. And mind you, these alu-steel flywheels can also have issues.... I have one from RHD. Still have to install it, but the machining and finishing is pretty good and the dimensions are all ok as far as I can check. It's made in Taiwan, and indeed does not have the timing pin, so you need to make your own. Not that difficult.
          Whether it's driveable on the street mostly depends on the combination with the clutch. I use OEM clutch (Sachs) and that will not give issues. This wheel in combination with a race type clutch is gone make it a bit more tricky. I've used combination of single mass light flywheels in combination with organic (not paddle) type clutches before and it's really hardly a difference in drievability.

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          • #6
            Chinese made items are a mixed bag. Some do what they are supposed to do, and are a great bargain. Others are cheap, compromised pieces of crap that can kill you.

            A flywheel is a fairly critical part, subject to great stresses...and it can be catastrophic when they fail....to the car at least. I'm not saying I would never use a cheap Chinese flywheel....but I would certainly be hesitant to do so.

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            • #7
              I agree with iron head that it is a critical component and you don't what that letting go at 8000 rpm, so a new aftermarket component might need some risk taking early adopters to use it before I pull the pin. A couple of positives though, Taiwan is not China and I have seen some really nice stuff come out of there lately, and I have personally met the owner of rhd and he is not one to sell rubbish. He has a super impressive m20 race engine in his e21 which hauls ass



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              • #8
                Yeah...

                If indeed it is made from chrome-moly steel...that fact...coupled with a significant amount of machining such a part would require...makes it just seem "too inexpensive" to me. My feeling is that corners must have been cut somewhere. While there are exceptions, I generally believe that you get what you pay for.

                But...maybe this part is one of those exceptions...I have definitely been wrong before.

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                • #9
                  The RHD flywheel is now in the car. Installation was pretty easy, everthing fits perfect, no issues. Combined it with a new crank seal, gearbox seals, new clutch and revising the shift mechanism. So far so good, engine response improved quite a lot in low gears, rev matching so much easier

                  And as noted already: Taiwan is not China. Not by far.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kazmaier View Post
                    Taiwan is not China. Not by far.
                    I have a much higher regard for Taiwan produced products than mainland China. I was the engineer responsible for design, selection and procurement of 3 4000hp fan/motor sets for a facility located in northern Alberta. The motors were made and run tested in Taiwan. High quality work with no hiccups. Didn't want any issues once they showed up at the site. So I am interested in one of these flywheels too.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looks good, but who knows how much testing went into that piece? Have any of you witnessed what happens when a flywheel comes apart @ 7,800 RPM? I have. I consider myself lucky that I still have my right foot. Missed by 2 inches. (on a E34 M5)
                      Can the vendor provide any hardness, nitriding and or any testing documents?
                      I'm not trying to be negative, but when something that large breaks up under load @ high RPM, the bell housing & the floor of the car ain't going to stop it.
                      As a generality I'd agree with the Taiwan VS: China quality.
                      My foot is worth more the the $400 savings.
                      I usually get wary when something is that much cheaper than the competition. Just saying....
                      Don Fields
                      MrMCar
                      www.mrmcar.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Its all aluminum, no steel friction surface. I'd steer clear of it. I've run an AASCO aluminum flywheel on my Datsun (came from Nissan Comp in 2003) and have had zero issues. I'll be buying one for the M3 when the time comes. They are about $500, made in Los Angeles. Replaceable steel friction surface that doesn't seem to ever wear (mine still shows cross hatching on the wear surface).

                        Will
                        '69 Datsun 2000 Roadster vintage race car (Street driven on a regular basis :taz
                        '59 Alfa Romeo 101 Sprint (HUGE project :uhoh
                        '88 M3

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RAD2LTR View Post
                          Its all aluminum, no steel friction surface. I'd steer clear of it. I've run an AASCO aluminum flywheel on my Datsun (came from Nissan Comp in 2003) and have had zero issues. I'll be buying one for the M3 when the time comes. They are about $500, made in Los Angeles. Replaceable steel friction surface that doesn't seem to ever wear (mine still shows cross hatching on the wear surface).

                          Will
                          The flywheel that is the topic of this thread I believe is machined from chrome-moly steel.

                          I have a Giken flywheel that is chrome-moly...about 6#....no issues at all after several years. So I know it "can" work. For me it's just that super cheap critical items like flywheels make me nervous.

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