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10year old timing parts (to use or not to use)

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  • L James
    commented on 's reply
    For the part that you're mentioning, I'd follow Ron's advice. Buy new. Other items, you maybe OK with NOS.

  • BMWi4
    replied
    Lol I mean my timing componenets have never prevented me from sleeping before, let alone for 20years of sleepless nights but I tend to agree with you and will just buying new.

    There is a guy with a bunch of nos parts that I was considering to purchase but might aswell just buy new from bmw for a few dollars more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron ///Man
    replied
    Buy new and sleep better every night for the next 20-30 years? They aren't THAT much $$$. You could always compare yours against the new ones when you get them and decide whether to use them and return the new ones, or just use the new ones?

    Leave a comment:


  • BMWi4
    replied
    My concern is as Ron///man said... I dont drive the car that often so probably will be another 20-30 years until I go to change the timing components again.

    So these plastic/rubber parts might be up to 40years old at the end of their service life...

    Thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron ///Man
    replied
    I believe the issue is that the rubber faces dry out over time. If you could compare a new / fresh one right next to your new / old ones you could determine how serviceable they might be. On new / fresh ones, if you jam your finger nail into the rubber, you'd see it's supple. On used ones that have seen thousands of heat cycles, the rubber has gotten hard and you can't jam your finger nail in at all. They are like a rock. When they reach that point, they wear more quickly and eventually shred apart. It's difficult to say how your new old stock has fared. I'd say jam your finger nail in the rubber and see if there's any 'give' at all. If there isn't any, I'd say don't use them as it's a big effort to replace them in the future.

    I have gotten new timing components recently and they seemed fine quality-wise.

    Leave a comment:


  • L James
    replied
    Originally posted by Mick View Post
    The quality of new OEM parts has fallen off so badly that you may be better off with new old stock.
    Agreed. Some of the new parts don't fit right or function properly. I.E. Spark Plug wrench - One of the new ones didn't even fit down the cylinder to extract the spark plug! How do you manufacture something and not test it to see if it works!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mick
    replied
    The quality of new OEM parts has fallen off so badly that you may be better off with new old stock.

    Leave a comment:


  • BMWi4
    replied
    Ok thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave @nz
    replied
    If it was mine I would look over the condition make sure it has not been damaged or stored in direct sunlight and reuse both items, I think the plastic part would get brittle with heat cycles or direct sunlight.

    Leave a comment:


  • BMWi4
    started a topic 10year old timing parts (to use or not to use)

    10year old timing parts (to use or not to use)

    What would be the consensus on using new old stock parts that are about 10 years old to redoo the timing components as preventative maintenance.

    For example the upper timing chain rail has what looks like rubber in it, will this rubber decay from sitting on a shelf? Also the plastic chain guide, does it get brittle with age?

    Any feedback would be helpful,

    Thanks
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