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  • #16
    Well I changed the oil again after 1000 miles to get another sample for analysis. As I was affraid of, when I dumped out the oil filter there was the glimmer of copper under a flashlight. It was far from as bad as I have seen in pictures but I am praying that I can get away with just new bearings.
    -kevin

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    • #17
      hmm, usually seeing copper flakes means you're FUBAR. I don't think you will really know until you pull it apart. Sorry to hear that :-(
      "It is needless to say that self-propelling vehicles, like other machines, will never do as much for one who does not understand them as for one who does."

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      • #18
        Kev,

        Sorry to hear that.
        ___________________
        JohnnyP
        1989 E30 M3
        2010 Audi S4

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        • #19
          I usually pull the coil wire when building oil pressure after a long sit. I do this with my Austin Healey. I do the same thing when I conduct an oil change with any of my rides. With the ///M, I disconnect the wires from the coil and crank the ingnition. This builds some oil presure before I start the motor with ignition.

          Regards...
          Christopher

          www.brmmotorsports.com

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          • #20
            Originally posted by WBSAK03
            I usually pull the coil wire when building oil pressure after a long sit. I do this with my Austin Healey. I do the same thing when I conduct an oil change with any of my rides. With the ///M, I disconnect the wires from the coil and crank the ingnition. This builds some oil presure before I start the motor with ignition.

            Regards...
            Wouldn't this flood the engine while you build pressure? I would think you would want to pull the fuel pump relay and the coil wire to prevent this from happening. No? am I wrong???

            Jordan
            "Never lift"

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            • #21
              That's what I was thinking, or at least foul the plugs....but hey, he says it works! I think John mentioned in another thread to pull the plugs, that way with no compression the engine could spin at 2000rpm to build good pressure with just the starter motor and have no load on the bearings.
              "It is needless to say that self-propelling vehicles, like other machines, will never do as much for one who does not understand them as for one who does."

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              • #22
                If you are going to turn the motor over with the starter for 5-10 seconds to build a little oil pressure, I don't think any plugs are going to be fouled. Additionally, were are only talking about a few second of fuel delivery without combustion. The motor won't flood with fuel. It's all flowing out the arse, remember? Anyway, this is the meathod I have used on a variety of vehicles for years. Never had any issues, not even on my 1961 Willy's Jeep pick-up.

                Later...
                Christopher

                www.brmmotorsports.com

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                • #23
                  sure it works. the main reason to pull plugs is to remove the load from the bearings until
                  oil is there. on high compression(>12 CR) then I dont think that is a bad idea.

                  John

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                  • #24
                    IMHO, removing the plugs is necessary for the reason John mentioned. I've also thought that it was potentially dangerous to the ECU to not have the coil grounded (that is, the spark plug to head) when firing the coil.

                    -Dietrich
                    (.02 spent)

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                    • #25
                      Back on topic

                      Kevin, remove the oil pans, then unbolt the rod end caps (one at a time - keep them paired) and look at the bearings and rod journals. Might as well start with #4 and work forward. It's usually the rears that get less oil and disintegrate.

                      Sorry man.

                      -Dietrich

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                      • #26
                        I am talking to Mario at VSR about doing a bearing job on it but I may drop the pans this weekend and get a preliminary look. If things dont look salvagable, then I will park the car for the summer and hope to get it back out next spring.
                        -kevin

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                        • #27
                          That's a bummer. I feel for you. But it is good to see that the Used Oil Analysis was right on. It is my opinion that anytime you see high amounts of copper, the bearings are gone. Just isn't another source of copper that will generate those kind of numbers.

                          I sure wish we knew if you had visible copper in your oil to correlate with those numbers.

                          Let us know about the condition of the crank, I am looking to try to correlate iron levels.
                          "E30 M3 . . . it's the perfect toy for an upscale closet wild man." Car and Driver, 1988 M3 Road Test

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