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just bought 88 m3 and have a few Q's Altenator? What kind of oil?

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  • just bought 88 m3 and have a few Q's Altenator? What kind of oil?

    :lostme: Just recently purchased a 88 e30 m3 with 114,000 miles on the clock. I have been able to fix many things so far by doing a search on this site, But i have a couple of things that i cant figure out. When i start the car some times the " brake fluid, antilock, and battery lights" stay on until i rev the engine slightly. It will also idle rough until i rev it up. After i rev it up the lights go out and idles better but still lumpy. I had to put a new battery in it when i purchased the car, and when I check the voltage to the battery with the car off it reads 12.6 +-, and with it running its in the 12.8-12.9 range. Also with 114,000 miles and living in georgia what kind of oil is recomended. I used to use 20w50 valvoline race oil in my boat with 500hps, Is that oil suitable for this car. The car has a chip, euro air box and stock exaust. It also has stock timming tensioner " i have already ordered a m50 tensioner".
    88 e30 m3
    07 gmc dmax
    03 HD road king
    harley gc

  • #2
    Hi,
    congrats on the purchase. One of the weird unexplicable things with these cars is that you always need to blip the throttle after starting it to get the warning lights for the brake fluid etc to go off. I use Castrol TWS 10W60 in my engine. The established thinking is that you shouldn't use very light weight oils such as 0W40 etc. These engines don't have a silky smooth idle, so your lumpy idle may be totally normal.
    Cheers, Tim.

    Comment


    • #3
      The "blip" is normal

      Lumpy idle could be an engine problem, could be a motor mount...ect. Might just feel lumpy too you.. does it ever settle?

      If you took a poll of everyone, most use: Redline (10W-40 recommended now a days) or Castrol TWS 10W60 (avalible from the dealer).

      Make sure you flush the fluids in the tranny, dif, and power steering too (who knows when they were last done). Use a good synthetic in all of those. The tranny calls for ATF.
      Steve
      "Technology is the only replacement for displacement" - TRD

      (For business related questions please contact my other user name '[email protected]')

      Comment


      • #4
        As a motor gets older the scarring on the cylinder walls may need "filling" it is my opinion that a diesel oil like Chevron DELO or Shell Rotella T should be used (or mixed) as they are the only oils that contain the "trace metals" now removed from conventional & synthetic oils. They usually are made in 15W40 weight but consider the mileage the transportation industry has to put on turbo diesel trucks. A bulletin was issued in 2004 re: break-in of new/rebuilt motors and recommended oils you can verify this with your local machinist.

        Redline ATF seems to be the fluid of choise for the transmission and differential, and their "shockproof" blends works well if you have a little whining. Personally, I like Motul but availability is far and few between... Autobacs has a very good selection.
        BTW: I hate our Alternator's Voltage Regulator it runs much lower than more modern cars... upgrades are out there ie. 535i, adjustable VR's
        Rich!

        Comment


        • #5
          First verify the accuracy of the voltmeter.
          If the Voltmeter is accurate you'll need to have the alternator repaired or replaced. Then you won't have the extra beacons lit.These extra warnings illuminated suggests insufficient voltage.

          m

          Comment


          • #6
            Needing to blip the throttle for the warning lights is normal. The rough idle, if it doesn't go away when warm could be leaking intake gaskets. It sounds like your alternator is shot...it should be putting out at least 13.5 volts. As for oil I wouldn't use a cold viscosity higher than 10 (I use 5 because I believe in a certain controversial article) and the hot viscosity shouldn't be less than 40.
            "It is needless to say that self-propelling vehicles, like other machines, will never do as much for one who does not understand them as for one who does."

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            • #7
              What is the appropriate / common idle RPM for these cars, once warm?
              Motorsport 16v

              Comment


              • #8
                Other than cost, is there a reason not to run Castrol TWS 10W-60 in this engine? That's what I use in my e46 M3, so other than price it would be a convenient oil to run in my case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by timsteren View Post
                  Hi,
                  congrats on the purchase. One of the weird unexplicable things with these cars is that you always need to blip the throttle after starting it to get the warning lights for the brake fluid etc to go off.
                  Cheers, Tim.
                  Correct.. this is NORMAL. It's not inexplicable when you know why. As I understand it, the E30 M3 was designed as a race car (most of us know this of course) , and even the street cars that were created to homologate the car for racing were never really intended to be sold in the US but as a road car for the select few that would buy it in Europe. Therefore, the pulleys are naturally UNDER driven by design. This is the same reason that S14s really don't cool well when at idle. The car was never designed as a vehicle that was going to sit in traffic.
                  Last edited by M3 Adjuster; 12-25-2007, 01:39 PM.
                  Mark Williams
                  Dallas, TX

                  Nothing says "welcome to the neighborhood" like a search... oh wait... looks like they are all gone! :rastajake:

                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mtony View Post
                    Other than cost, is there a reason not to run Castrol TWS 10W-60 in this engine? That's what I use in my e46 M3, so other than price it would be a convenient oil to run in my case.
                    An e46 M3 is a 10-14 year newer car designed for street use.... we won't go into the homogalation of it... but a totally different purpose built car.

                    It is primarily a preference thing... Synthetic oils have their purpose, this car was designed in an era that didn't really use them... and the mineral oil they used has been deemed obsoleted and/or harmful to the environment.

                    I'm sure someone will correct my train of thought but if modern synthetic oils resist thermal breakdown that would also make them poor thermal conductors... keeping heat in the motor, a well known find in air-cooled motors i.e. early Porsche/VW motors that tried synthetic. Secondly, the slippery surface may reduce the coefficent of friction but in a high mileage motor with less than optimal sealing you may get some consumption... I dunno, I may be wrong but at the extra expense I'd consider an alternative or a good middle ground.
                    Last edited by ///schwartzman; 12-25-2007, 05:45 PM.
                    Rich!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Synthetics are superior lubricants, flow better at low temp, give superior film strength and resistance to oxidation and thermal breakdown. If one wants the best protection and longevity for his engine, there is no reason whatsoever to use a conventional oil (aside from cost). I've seen the difference synthetics make over the long-term, and the best thing that can happen as far as I am concerned is for conventional oils to go the way of the dodo.

                      I would be reluctant to recommend 10w-60 for two reasons. (1) I can only imagine the polymer content required to cover such a spread. (2) I see no reason to run 60 weight oil in these engines, which almost certainly reduces a bit of power and economy.

                      The first thing I did when I took delivery of my E30 M3 was to have it filled with Mobil 1 10w-30. This oil did a good job of loosening deposits left behind from years of conventional oil, and whereas the oil was previously dirty, all the funk drained right out of it, and the oil now stays clean. I am going to go up one step in viscosity, and it should remain clean.

                      A recommendation for an E30 M3 with a newer engine in a climate that sees cold winters and hot summers would be Mobil 1 0w-40.
                      http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...l_1_0W-40.aspx

                      A recommendation for an E30 M3 with a high-mileage original engine would be High Mileage 10w-40
                      http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...ge_10W-40.aspx

                      A recommendation for track use would be to step up in viscosity to a 15w-50
                      http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...1_15W-50_.aspx


                      And for those who are interested, here is a very good, unbiased article on what to consider when selecting motor oil:
                      http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/tech...il_article.htm
                      Last edited by Ted B; 12-25-2007, 06:59 PM.
                      2003 Mitsu EVO VIII - 2.0L / 600+whp
                      1988 BMW M3 turbo - Work in progress. . .
                      1986 SVO Mustang - Work in progress. . .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As for transmission oil, there is one product which I've used in both my EVO transmission and the T5 in my SVO to great effect and a noticeable improvement in both. As for how it will work in the Getrag, I suspect it would deliver equally good results. I've never seen anything but praise about this product, and having witnessed the difference myself, I have nothing but very good things to say about it.

                        http://www.bgprod.com/products/driveline.html
                        http://www.prostreetonline.com/x/bg-synchroshift.asp
                        Last edited by Ted B; 12-25-2007, 07:06 PM.
                        2003 Mitsu EVO VIII - 2.0L / 600+whp
                        1988 BMW M3 turbo - Work in progress. . .
                        1986 SVO Mustang - Work in progress. . .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I forgot to mention that I have used and like Valvoline Racing 20/50 as a dino oil, Mobil 15/50 Synthetic, and Royal Purple 20/50 Synthetic. I prefer the Royal Purple... Redline makes great stuff too.
                          Mark Williams
                          Dallas, TX

                          Nothing says "welcome to the neighborhood" like a search... oh wait... looks like they are all gone! :rastajake:

                          sigpic

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree with this post. I have been changing over to synthetics after years of conventional oil use. I would also say that if you have a turbo than I would definately use synthetic to reduce coking in the turbo bearings after hot shut down. If you read the history of synthetic oils they had to be developed for the aircraft industry to work in high heat high rpm jet engines.

                            Originally posted by Ted B View Post
                            Synthetics are superior lubricants, flow better at low temp, give superior film strength and resistance to oxidation and thermal breakdown. If one wants the best protection and longevity for his engine, there is no reason whatsoever to use a conventional oil (aside from cost). I've seen the difference synthetics make over the long-term, and the best thing that can happen as far as I am concerned is for conventional oils to go the way of the dodo.

                            I would be reluctant to recommend 10w-60 for two reasons. (1) I can only imagine the polymer content required to cover such a spread. (2) I see no reason to run 60 weight oil in these engines, which almost certainly reduces a bit of power and economy.

                            The first thing I did when I took delivery of my E30 M3 was to have it filled with Mobil 1 10w-30. This oil did a good job of loosening deposits left behind from years of conventional oil, and whereas the oil was previously dirty, all the funk drained right out of it, and the oil now stays clean. I am going to go up one step in viscosity, and it should remain clean.

                            A recommendation for an E30 M3 with a newer engine in a climate that sees cold winters and hot summers would be Mobil 1 0w-40.
                            http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...l_1_0W-40.aspx

                            A recommendation for an E30 M3 with a high-mileage original engine would be High Mileage 10w-40
                            http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...ge_10W-40.aspx

                            A recommendation for track use would be to step up in viscosity to a 15w-50
                            http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...1_15W-50_.aspx


                            And for those who are interested, here is a very good, unbiased article on what to consider when selecting motor oil:
                            http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/tech...il_article.htm
                            There'll be Spandex jackets one for everyone ...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              +1 on RP
                              sigpic

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