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  • Cam Carrier Removal

    I am in the process of disassembling the engine to asses the condition and start the rebuilding process. Currently I am down to removing the cam carrier, the koala CD says it could take some time to remove but it does not say how I should attempt to remove it. Are there any secrets to the removal? Any places I can stick a screwdriver to pry it of? Do I just pull like crazy until it comes off?

    Thanks in advanced.

  • #2
    The only potential problem spot (I am assuming you have already removed the cams) is the allen bolts that hold the cam carrier in. These can strip if you are not careful. I would use a new allen socket (6mm I believe), and I personally believe you are less likely to strip the bolts if you grind the end of the allen tool so it is flat (most taper a bit to make them easier to insert). Use an extension on the end of your socket wrench, and use downward pressure while you sort of "pop" the bolt loose....

    Once all the bolts/nuts are out, I have always found a few light whacks with a rubber hammer has loosened the cam carrier. Never really a problem.....

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    • #3
      In addition to the (16?) 6 mm allen bolts in the bottom of the carrier, don't forget the five 5 mm allen bolts on the front of the carrier.. and yes.. all of these are very soft so use a GOOD allen.. I use a 3/8 ratchet with a 3/8 to allen socket... a 6 " extension actually helps quite a bit. Break all of these free by hand.. if you do strip the allen bolt pn the 5 mm bolts you'll have to carefully use a dremel. you may be able to make a cut in the of the bolt and use a screwdriver, or you may have to cut it off, in either case watch the cam box.

      As with Ironhead, a few whacks from a rubber mallet gets this free.. If you used Yamabond to install the cam tray, whack a little more firmly.
      Last edited by M3 Adjuster; 06-01-2008, 11:16 AM.
      Mark Williams
      Dallas, TX

      Nothing says "welcome to the neighborhood" like a search... oh wait... looks like they are all gone! :rastajake:

      sigpic

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      • #4
        Thanks...

        By the time I posted about removing the cam carrier I was done with removing the bolts and nuts. This was not a problem thanks to the research previously done on this forum. My problem was with detaching the cam carrier from the head.

        Definately the rubber hammer must be the better way of doing this, but since I did not have one handy, this is what I did....please do not laugh!!!..But it worked.

        Obviously went very slowly without applying too much torque as not to damage the cam carrier.

        Click image for larger version

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        And this is what my pistons look like...#4 is clean...what's up with that?

        Click image for larger version

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        Thanks again...
        Last edited by papolosa; 06-01-2008, 12:22 PM.

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        • #5
          You used a puller to pull on the spark plug holes, applying pressure on the cam carrier??? I have no idea how this worked, given that the spark plug holes are an integral part of the cam carrier. I assume you also removed the 8mm hex nuts holding the cam tray down the middle?

          I usually just get a good grip on the 2 big holes in the front and just give it a good tug or two straight up.

          Originally posted by papolosa View Post
          Thanks...

          By the time I posted about removing the cam carrier I was done with removing the bolts and nuts. This was not a problem thanks to the research previously done on this forum. My problem was with detaching the cam carrier from the head.

          Definately the rubber hammer must be the better way of doing this, but since I did not have one handy, this is what I did....please do not laugh!!!..But it worked.

          Obviously went very slowly without applying too much torque as not to damage the cam carrier.

          [ATTACH]836[/ATTACH]


          And this is what my pistons look like...#4 is clean...what's up with that?

          [ATTACH]837[/ATTACH]
          Thanks again...

          Comment


          • #6
            Could be that 4 was running a bit lean? Spark plug look any different than the others?
            What was the reason for disassembling the motor for the rebuild?

            Nice pistons.... are they ceramic coated? Definitely aftermarket with serious valve reliefs.... I imagine that they should clean up and you'll be ready for some nice cams...
            Mark Williams
            Dallas, TX

            Nothing says "welcome to the neighborhood" like a search... oh wait... looks like they are all gone! :rastajake:

            sigpic

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            • #7
              Cyl. #4 seems to be the weak-link in the S14 motor... My question (running around in my head) is how do we combat the lean condition / heat soak in cyl #4?
              Improve the coolant and or pump, add an additional fan against the firewall, oil squirter on just #4 piston? I'm willing to try anything to prevent toasting another #4 rod bearing.
              Rich!

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              • #8
                marques, the piece of wood the puller stud is pressing against is on top of the studs coming from the head. I purposely put the hex nuts flushed with the top of the stud to create a greater surface area for the wood to rest on. So the puller tabs (side thingies or whatever) are engaged on the lips of the sparkplug holes pulling the cam carrier against the studs on the head. Get it? I did try to pull from the two big holes but nada.

                M3 Adjuster, the reason for disassembly was blue smoke from the pipes, very noisy valve train and very weird histories that do not match coming from the previous owner and previous mechanic concerning a recent rebuild. About the pistons, you have just revealed to me that they are not the factory ones; I will find what they are once I finish disassembling the bottom. The sparkplug on #4 was shut full of carbon buildup so I presume the car was running as a three banger and the piston was washed with fuel.


                - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - AUTOMERGED! There's no thread "bumping" or "double posting" within a 24hr period. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


                BTW, did not mean to post with dark text... don't have the edit button available so can't fix it.
                Last edited by papolosa; 06-01-2008, 03:35 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

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                • #9
                  Regarding the number 4 cylinder, I noticed the same thing to a lesser degree when I recently had my engine apart:



                  Clearly there seems to be something about the S14 that causes #4 to run a bit leaner than the others. It is probably as simple as the way the air flows into the engine via the airbox, or something like that. I don't think it would be much of a factor in losing the #4 rod bearing though, unless the lean condition in that cylinder is causing detonation (which is certainly possible).

                  My car has oil squirters, so I don't think the condition is solely related to heat.

                  I am not going to worry about it in my case, but it would be interesting to leave everything tuned the same, but install the next notch up on injector size (in my case 46 lb/hr instead of 44) to cylinder 4 only and see if the condition remains. To really "know", you would have to install some sort of "per cylinder" WBo2 or EGT instrumentation. Hell with that..........:HeadsSpinning:

                  So I am just going to live with it. Yours looks a bit more extreme though.
                  Last edited by Ironhead; 06-01-2008, 06:10 PM.

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                  • #10
                    OK, I get it mow... pretty ingenious.

                    What kind of oil have you or the prior owner been using? Seems like a fair amount of gunk/varnish on the cam carrier, chain guides, etc, consistent with regular oil, not synthetic, and parts that were not changed during a rebuild.

                    -Luis


                    Originally posted by papolosa View Post
                    marques, the piece of wood the puller stud is pressing against is on top of the studs coming from the head. I purposely put the hex nuts flushed with the top of the stud to create a greater surface area for the wood to rest on. So the puller tabs (side thingies or whatever) are engaged on the lips of the sparkplug holes pulling the cam carrier against the studs on the head. Get it? I did try to pull from the two big holes but nada.

                    M3 Adjuster, the reason for disassembly was blue smoke from the pipes, very noisy valve train and very weird histories that do not match coming from the previous owner and previous mechanic concerning a recent rebuild. About the pistons, you have just revealed to me that they are not the factory ones; I will find what they are once I finish disassembling the bottom. The sparkplug on #4 was shut full of carbon buildup so I presume the car was running as a three banger and the piston was washed with fuel.

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                    • #11
                      Perhaps cyl #4 has been steam cleaned by a leaking head gasket.
                      What??? an E30 M3 for sale??? I'll be right there!!!

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