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  • Euro exhaust to cat conversion

    I'm in the process of switching my Supersprint euro exhaust to a cat. converter system. I've purchased a dual 2" in dual 2" out Magnaflow cat. and I'm going to cut out the Supersprint resonator and install the cat. in it's location.

    I've looked around quite a bit and have considered a number of options. I've found a used M3 exhaust system for $250 plus shipping, but, decided against a used system. I've also looked at the VSR system for $800 plus shipping. It looks pretty good and I've heard good things about it. I've also investigated a custom 3" exhaust with a merge "Y" pipe where the "X" pipe is then 3" cat and muffler all the way back. It would cost about $750.

    I think I'll start with trying the dual Magnaflow first, and see how it works. It was only about $100 including shipping. This also gives me a reason to either buy a Oxy/ecetylene setup of a small Mig welder. I've got a couple of friends with Migs, so, I'm leaning towards the Oxy/Ecetylene setup.

    Any comments would be greatly apprciated!

    Damon in STL
    Damon in STL
    '99 e39 540 Sport 6spd (DD), '88 e30 M3 - GTS2 #72 - Motorcraft Ignition, Volvo Injectors, Thrush Turbo Muffler, Open Source ECU, Aerospace Connectors, Lowes' Polycarbonate, Alumacore Front Splitter and Rear Diffuser, Racer's Tape.

  • #2
    If you are gonna weld on stainless or aluminum, you need a good welder! Id steer away from a cheap Mig and save your money for at the very least a Miller or Lincon with shield gas options. The cheaper stuff uses flux core wire that leaves spatter all over your work. Fine for building farm fences, but not the best thing on a BMW. I'd save the oxy/act setup for cutting. Yes, you can make beautiful welds with a gas setup but it takes a lot of time.

    Im not sure of your welding experience so if you already knew all of this info please forgive me.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the info. I was leaning towards buying the Oxy/Acetylene setup for the cutting/braziing side. The two friends both have Miller (I think Miller is red and Lincoln is blue). One is a lower end 110v setup and the other is a nice 220v higher end setup. I've done a bit of stick welding in the past, but, it's been about 20 years since I've done any kind of welding. And, I have no experience with Mig welding. I might sign up for a welding course at one of the local tech schools.

      I think I'm going to go with a portable Oxy/Ecetylene setup (which I've used in the past). Neither friend currently has one, so, I'll add it to our communal tool chest. The way I look at it is that buying new tools are my tutiion to learning. I can always pay someone else to do the work, but, money alone can't buy knowledge.

      As my welding skills develop, I'll probably bite the bullet and spend the $1000-$1500 and buy a good used TIG setup. I've got a number of future projects which involve custom aluminum and stainless fabrication. In the long run it's more cost effective (and fun) to buy the tools and do it myself.

      Damon in STL
      Damon in STL
      '99 e39 540 Sport 6spd (DD), '88 e30 M3 - GTS2 #72 - Motorcraft Ignition, Volvo Injectors, Thrush Turbo Muffler, Open Source ECU, Aerospace Connectors, Lowes' Polycarbonate, Alumacore Front Splitter and Rear Diffuser, Racer's Tape.

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      • #4
        It really pays to take a few welding classes IMO. Especially if you want to TIG and MIG aluminum and stainless. There are some things you need to know to get a strong and pretty weld. If you are considering a welder, try to purchase a 220v version as they have a longer duty cycle. A higher duty cycle means a longer weld time between cooldowns. You have the brands backwards, Miller is blue, Lincon is red. Both brands are very good, but you still want to purchase as much welder as you can afford.

        If it were me, Id save the oxy/act setup for another day and buy a middle range MIG welder and a plasma torch in either order. Nothing cuts quite like a plasma torch! You can do very nice work with very little practice. Besides, you dont have to keep very toxic and explosive gases laying around in the garage. With this setup and perhaps a TIG, you could do most anything you wanted or needed. Just my $.02 anyway.

        Welding has been a nice and rewarding learning process for me. I suggest that any car crazy person learn the art as it is always a big help!

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