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  • #16
    Going back to basics, Any feed back, loop or noise can usually be traced back to the ground, 98% of the time.

    In talking to friends there is a sure fire method to checking your ground.

    Check the ohms on the ground wire itself with ohm meter. hold the leads of the meter at both ends of the ground wire(not the body just the wire). You should see no more than .5 ohms.

    This is considered a good ground connection, .5 ohms or less.

    Second Check the ends of the ground connection, Crimped 4 gauge is usually a bad connection, due to size(common problem they say), soldered to a connector is usually best.

    Ground contact must be bare metal to the body. Battery terminal is worst, studs or screws connected to the body aren't usually good either. This is why some use heavier wire on the ground side to elminate the resistance(ohms). I didn't want bare metal so I went heavier on wiring.

    Once eliminating the ground as a factor you're left with the wiring to the amp as one wire may be making contact and the amp is simply protecting itself or the amp itself may be bad.

    The pop may be generated by the amp itself or TPS, remember an amp converts low signals to high. The popping is ultimately generated by something and even though its speculation on the TPS, the fact that the noise is only on throttle response means something. On GM cars its common on the brakes(small pop w/bad ground and hitting the brakes).

    Hope this helps.

    L.
    Last edited by Lionel; 06-17-2009, 12:19 AM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Lionel View Post
      Check the ohms on the ground wire itself with ohm meter. hold the leads of the meter at both ends of the ground wire(not the body just the wire). You should see no more than .5 ohms.

      This is considered a good ground connection, .5 ohms or less.

      Second Check the ends of the ground connection, Crimped 4 gauge is usually a bad connection, due to size(common problem they say), soldered to a connector is usually best.
      Great info, thanks Lionel! I have not checked the actual ground cable itself yet.


      Originally posted by Lionel View Post
      Ground contact must be bare metal to the body. Battery terminal is worst, studs or screws connected to the body aren't usually good either. This is why some use heavier wire on the ground side to elminate the resistance(ohms). I didn't want bare metal so I went heavier on wiring.
      I would be more inclined to up the wire gauge than drill/scrape new holes.
      I assume I should be avoiding connecting to the ground strap location on the body where the negative battery cable goes as well, correct?


      Thanks!
      -Chris
      Chris L.

      Spray paint and tire shine doesn't equate to a "restoration!"

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      • #18
        Since this only occurs when lifting off the throttle , NEVER LIFT!

        Hammer down!

        Mario L.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Mario L. View Post
          Since this only occurs when lifting off the throttle , NEVER LIFT!

          Hammer down!

          Mario L.
          Your office phone is off the hook.... :peekaboo::nope:
          Chris L.

          Spray paint and tire shine doesn't equate to a "restoration!"

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          • #20
            No. I'm on the phone working!!! :yeah:

            Mario L.
            Last edited by Mario L.; 06-17-2009, 06:49 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by UNHCLL View Post
              Great info, thanks Lionel! I have not checked the actual ground cable itself yet.




              I would be more inclined to up the wire gauge than drill/scrape new holes.
              I assume I should be avoiding connecting to the ground strap location on the body where the negative battery cable goes as well, correct?


              Thanks!
              -Chris
              Chris,

              Happy to be of help.

              In theory you are right about the battery stud, but may be trial and error until you find a good spot that gets you to the magic number of .5 ohms or less.

              I shyed away from bare metal as well. With my friends Silver M I used the tower locations, 2 amps with 4 gauge each gave and zero feedback. On mine I used the left side wheel chock location(stud) but I did up the wire gauge.

              Its all about getting to that no resistance spot that gets the noise out.

              As it is, it's a strange problem, and there may be more to factor out until we can get to the root cause.

              At least we have somewhere to start.

              Keep us posted.

              L.

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              • #22
                The pop has resolved itself... by burning up the amp.

                Started the car, had no sound from the speakers, and proceeded to open the trunk to see lots of white smoke coming out of the amp.

                Took the amp to the local BA Authorized Dealer, and they discovered the following:



                Now I will have to call BA on Monday and see if they will cover this under warranty since the amp was purchased less than a year ago.

                To top it off, the head for one of the cosmetic cover screws also sheared off today. Right now Boston Acoustics is dangerously close to moving to the very top of my Black Listed Companies. I am none to pleased to say the least, and can only hope that when I call them Monday they resolve this in an expedient and corrective manner.
                Chris L.

                Spray paint and tire shine doesn't equate to a "restoration!"

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