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  • Centre Locks

    Does anyone definitely know if you need right and left handed thread on centre locks and if so, which side goes where?

    Cheers,

    Warren

  • #2
    there are hub right and left, when you ride forward, the wheel rotates in the direction of tightening the screw

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by julien View Post
      there are hub right and left, when you ride forward, the wheel rotates in the direction of tightening the screw
      False for the mount.
      Hubs with a reverse thread have to be mounted on passenger's side (standard LHD) and standard thread on the driver side.

      This is due to the resisting torque.

      http://www.motorsport-legends.net/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SP-M3E30 View Post
        Hubs with a reverse thread have to be mounted on passenger's side (standard LHD) and standard thread on the driver side.
        This makes a lot of sense.


        [email protected]

        1969 2002 racecar
        1989 M3 racecar
        e39 Touring

        Comment


        • #5
          Actually, after thinking about it, I think that the reverse thread shall be on the driverside (LHD car).


          [email protected]

          1969 2002 racecar
          1989 M3 racecar
          e39 Touring

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LeeVuong View Post
            Actually, after thinking about it, I think that the reverse thread shall be on the driverside (LHD car).
            Do you have a reason to think that ?

            Look at this video at 2'05"

            "...the right side of the car is a reverse thread and the left side is a standard thread..."

            Last edited by SP-M3E30; 06-02-2012, 10:11 AM.

            http://www.motorsport-legends.net/

            Comment


            • #7
              Lee,

              Actually it makes the most sense for right hand thread (std) being on the Driver Side, and left hand thread (reverse) being on the Pass Side...theory is that the thread tightens opposite the direction of wheel rotation, thus maintaining tightness.

              John

              Originally posted by LeeVuong View Post
              Actually, after thinking about it, I think that the reverse thread shall be on the driverside (LHD car).
              Last edited by 02fanatic; 06-02-2012, 10:11 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 02fanatic View Post
                ...theory is that the thread tightens opposite the direction of wheel rotation, thus maintaining tightness.

                John
                That's why I'm talking about "resisting torque"

                http://www.motorsport-legends.net/

                Comment


                • #9
                  BUT....

                  Would more (potentially) loosening torque be applied to the nut during braking or during acceleration? That is an important question.

                  I am sure the answer depends a lot on the car, but in general I would think much greater force would be applied during braking. If you locked a wheel traveling at high speed, that would effect the nut almost like an impact wrench...either tightening or loosening it depending on the thread direction.

                  I mention this, because resisting loosening torque during acceleration would require the opposite thread orientation from that which would resist loosening during braking.....
                  Last edited by Ironhead; 06-02-2012, 11:22 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I thought we were talking about wheel center caps, not thread nuts....oh well

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SP-M3E30 View Post
                      False for the mount.
                      Hubs with a reverse thread have to be mounted on passenger's side (standard LHD) and standard thread on the driver side.

                      This is due to the resisting torque.

                      this is what I mean, when you go forward it is in the tightening direction

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Guys,
                        Both sides of the car tighten towards the REAR of the car.
                        When you think center locks think "tight rear", its easy to remember.

                        So whatever side of the car you are on the nuts tighten towards the rear of the car (drivers RH thread, pass LH thread).
                        HTH
                        jimmy p
                        jimmy p.
                        87 E30 M3 Prodrive British Touring Car
                        88 E30 M3 Zinnoberot - Street
                        88 E30 M3 Lachsilber - Race (#98 SCCA SPU)
                        92 E30 M Technic Cabrio - S14 POWERED!
                        98 318Ti M44, Base - Morea Green
                        04 Ford F350 - V10

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by julien View Post
                          this is what I mean, when you go forward it is in the tightening direction
                          In fact you can't tell this because if you are on passenger's side and if you go forward, the tightening direction is in the opposite (LH thread)

                          A pic from Conrod. You can note a small notch on the nut. That mean it's a reverse thread (LH thread)


                          http://www.motorsport-legends.net/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jimmy p. View Post
                            Guys,
                            Both sides of the car tighten towards the REAR of the car.
                            When you think center locks think "tight rear", its easy to remember.

                            So whatever side of the car you are on the nuts tighten towards the rear of the car (drivers RH thread, pass LH thread).
                            HTH
                            jimmy p
                            I don't doubt you are right Jimmy....my question was more just one of curiosity. Wouldn't braking/decelleration be as likely/more likely to loosen the nut than any acceleration? I would think most racing cars can generate far more "Gs" braking than accelerating.

                            If so, then why is it essential that the nuts tighten to the rear?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think the main objective is to have them tighten in the same direction, not necessarily in a particular direction. This keeps dynamic torque forces equal.

                              Jake

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