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  • galvanic corrosion?

    Hey guys, please excuse my lack of knowledge. I saw on the Euro intake thread the Ireland Engineering billet aluminum rear swaybar mounts and it got me thinking...

    I've always been told that aluminum and steel are bad materials to work with when they're in direct contact. Over time you get galvanic corrosion. Anyway, can someone clear this up for me since I see aftermarket parts using aluminum without isolating and there doesn't seem to be a problem. Or is there?

    Any quick answer will do.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Yes it will occur, as soon as the coating on the aluminum is abraded off by the movement of the bar. It will occur sooner if the car is subjected to water.
    These parts are designed for a car that sees occasional duty...a race car, that usually will have this kit changed between events, and are lubed between each event.
    When race type linkages and parts are installed on a street driven car, the maintentance is constant.
    m.

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    • #3
      with those parts it's nothing you have to worry about in this lifetime
      A friend will come bail you out of jail, but a TRUE friend will be sitting next to you in the jail cell saying, "Dude, that was focking awesome!"

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      • #4
        Why? Why? Why?

        3 Rockwell Hardness difference between the two mating materials is know to withstand the most ware. 6061 on cold-drawn steel is way more than 3 Rockwell.

        UHMW2 is a superb material for such application as the sway-bar mounts. Will blow away hard urethane and is self-lubricating. There is no-need to go full-metal mounting. Those mounts are available in Aluminum because it is cheap; period.

        Mark
        Last edited by ///Mous3; 08-06-2004, 10:23 AM.

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        • #5
          if I understood the question, he's talking about galvanic corrosion between where the aluminum mount attaches to the steel chassis. Theory is fine, but realistically as beefy as the mount is I wouldn't think twice about it (mech. engineer).

          The Ireland rear swaybar mounts come with urethane bushings for the swaybar to pivot on, they are not metal-metal:

          Our billet aluminum rear sway bar mount kits solve the problem of the e30's weak sway bar mount. If you use a sway bar larger than stock, the body mount will fail sooner or later. If you get under the car and look at how it's made, you will understand. If you wait until the mount fails the fix is much more dificult. Our billet aluminum mount attaches to the stock piece but also has 2 bolts through the trunk floor with a backing plate inside the trunk. Installation is easy all you need is a drill and 8mm (5/16) bit. You can even install them without removing the sway bar. Kit includes all hardware required. We have urethane bushings for any size sway bar up to 25mm. Please specify sway bar diameter. These are sold by the pair.
          Last edited by TeamM3; 08-06-2004, 10:54 AM.
          A friend will come bail you out of jail, but a TRUE friend will be sitting next to you in the jail cell saying, "Dude, that was focking awesome!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the replies. Yeah I meant the contact between the aluminum and the existing steel of the chassis. Also the stainless bolts with the aluminum. Didn't mean to pick on IE either, as I'm sure they make a fine product. It was just that it was their sway bar mounts that got me thinking.

            I'm not in any way informed so I just wanted to know some opinions on the topic in general.

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            • #7
              If you have to drill it, it ain't worth it!

              By the way, how many seconds are you trying to shave off from your lap time? Come on!!!!! Isn't there another way?

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              • #8
                Just wanted to know about the corrosion factor, not the Ireland Engineering units.

                Thanks again!

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                • #9
                  anybody that is using reinforced rear swaybar mounts to keep from tearing the chassis tabs off is drilling holes, they "all" mount this way or at least I'm not aware of anything else
                  A friend will come bail you out of jail, but a TRUE friend will be sitting next to you in the jail cell saying, "Dude, that was focking awesome!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TeamM3
                    anybody that is using reinforced rear swaybar mounts to keep from tearing the chassis tabs off is drilling holes, they "all" mount this way or at least I'm not aware of anything else
                    There are two ways. The first drills 4 small holes in the trunk, the other way which leaves big holes in the trunk when the sway bar rips it way out. The galvanic action is no real threat. There are aluminum to steel joints all over the car. Now thats two mech. engineers giving their opinion here. You make the call.

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                    • #11
                      who makes the small hole version?
                      A friend will come bail you out of jail, but a TRUE friend will be sitting next to you in the jail cell saying, "Dude, that was focking awesome!"

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