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2.6/2.7 Stroker S14's

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  • 2.6/2.7 Stroker S14's

    I know Dinan offered a 2.6 stroker kit for the S14. ACS even has an 88mm (2.6?) crank and I've seen custom 92mm cranks out there for the S14. I'm wondering if any of you actually know anyone with these setups. I'm curious to see the gains with these cranks.

    88 M3 - LACHSSILBER/M TECH
    89 M3 - ALPINEWEISS II/SCHWARZ
    85 323I S52 - ALPINEWEISS/SCHWARZ
    91 M TECHNIC TURBO - MACAOBLAU/M TECH



  • #2
    I thought I read something about a 2.8 S14 on S14.de?

    I really haven't heard/seen much other than a 2.5l S14 over here in the US.

    Comment


    • #3
      I know DINAN made a 2.6, and I've heard of 2.7s and 2.9s, but that's about it.
      I would love to get some info on the 2.7/2.9s.
      -Han

      Comment


      • #4
        look at this site...

        http://www.bmwclassics.freewire.co.uk/crazy/index.html


        To most, in the year two thousand, the technology of the eighties seems antiquated. It was in the early eighties that the M3 concept was born. BMW needed a car to compete in the European Touring Car Championships, and in order to do so at least five thousand road going versions of the race car had to be produced. The three series was the most highly produced model of the Munich manufacturer's line up; so it was decided that it would be the platform upon which the future legend was to be built. BMW could never have imagined how successful the first generation M3 would be - it became the most successful touring car ever.

        Upon strapping yourself into an E30 M3 today, the car hardly feels like an antique. The first generation M3 may not be as civilized as the second generation E36 M3, but it offers far more driver involvement and is an absolute blast to drive.

        This particular M3 has a bit more kick to it, thanks to some extensive work by Dinan.

        The car began its life being sold to a member of the German consulate, and shortly after made its way into the hands of a former F14 pilot, to whom ridiculous speeds had been a way of life. This poor innocent M3 wasn't to remain in its stock form for long. The car began its metamorphosis with the usual modifications - new chip, evolution cam gear, new springs and shocks, all from Dinan.

        Speed is like an addiction. Once you get hooked, you always want more. In mid 1992 this M3 took an eighteen month break from life on the roads of Northern California and spent the time at Dinan, undergoing an extensive buildup. At that time Dinan was only offering a 2.5 litre engine for the M3, producing 245 horsepower and 234 ft/lb of torque; or a turbocharged engine, delivering 323 horsepower and 324 ft/lb of torque. The former was unable to supply the power necessary to turn the M3 into something that could compete with the thrill of an F14; the latter incorporated a turbo that was arguably, too large for this application, creating excessive lag. Dinan was given the task of producing an immensely powerful, yet immediately responsive engine. This car is the product of their efforts.

        In order to build an engine more powerful than the peaky standard M3 unit (code S14), there was a simple solution - more displacement...and so to work on a 2.6 litre engine:

        The bore was increased to 94.6mm, equivalent to the 2.5 litre motor. To achieve another tenth of a litre the stroke was increased to 92mm. In order to extend the stroke to this length, a custom crankshaft was ground from a solid piece of billet steel, this took five months to produce. The rods were replaced with racing titanium units, and the pistons were replaced with Dinan high performance pistons and rings. In addition to internal modifications, new performance software was installed via a replacement chip. Cam timing was optimised with custom cam sprockets allowing the advantage of the increased displacement to be fully realised.

        Induction is via a large K&N filter with exhaust gases being expelled into the stock header. These then pass through a Supersprint centre resonator and exit through a Hartge muffler. The engine thus produced 282 horsepower and 267 ft/lb of torque. As if this wasn't enough, a new intake camshaft was added - extracting a further 10 horsepower and moving the peak torque to a lower rpm.

        With all of this extra power there was a need for additional modifications beyond the Dinan Stage I Suspension components that were already installed. Dinan's Stage III Suspension was therefore installed, adding thicker front and rear sway bars along with a set of camber plates. The rear springs were also custom-made by Dinan, differing slightly from those normally included with the kit; thus avoiding the rear of the car sitting too low. Dinan's lightweight, three-piece, 17x8.5 inch wheels were installed at all four corners, wrapped in 245/40 ZR rubber. After this long stay at Dinan the car was returned to the road - now it was time to see how it matched up to an F14!

        Is this car capable of scaring an F14 pilot? Probably not. But is an F14 pilot at the wheel capable of terrifying the passenger? An emphatic yes would be the answer based on my personal experience! It took one ride in the car for me to know that I had to have one. It seemed things were going my way that day, for it just so happened that the car was for sale... and I bought it!

        After a couple of months in the driver's seat, the car isn't quite so terrifying. Stomping on the accelerator still induces thrills best reserved for a race track. In stock form, the M3 has the performance to back up its muscular looks, but after its transformation this 1988 M3 has far surpassed all of my expectations. 0-60 mph is accomplished in the high four second range, enabling it to keep up with a C5 Corvette or a Ferrari F355. The car pulls hard all the way to its 8,000 rpm limit. Handling seems almost limitless as the tyres stick like glue through corners, the car acting in very predictable manner.

        Most people's first complaint about the E30 M3 is its lack of torque, making the car less than a joy to drive in traffic. With an approximate increase of 50% in both horsepower and torque, arriving at about the same rpm as stock, the Dinan M3 is very tractable in stop and go traffic - or just about anywhere else for that matter. The car is at home cruising at high speeds on the freeway, however due to the wide tyres it may wander, following grooved surfaces on the road. Where this car really shines is on the back roads where it can be pushed. Speed limits not only beg to be broken, but doubled or even tripled, the car remaining incredibly poised. Handling is superb with amazing balance, turn in and wonderful feedback. The car speaks to the driver as the two become one, linked through the car's controls. Power is on demand - at any rpm. For a high output four cylinder engine flexibility is incredible, although things become very entertaining from 4,000 rpm upwards!

        The transformation of this M3 into a true supercar is accompanied by quite a hefty price tag:

        The Stage II 2.6 litre stroker motor comes in at $12,860 for the short block.

        $999 for the intake cam, plus 29+ hours of labour, and a $5,500 refundable core deposit.

        The Stage III Suspension System is available for either $1,451 or $1,639 depending on the shock absorbers used, plus the cost of 11.5 hours of labour.

        In all, the receipts for the work done to this beast of a BMW add up to about ... (wait for it - Ed)... $80,000!

        However, $11,000 of this total amount was squandered on the stereo which is capable of breaking all the windows in the car with its 3,000 watt output.

        The Dinan 2.6 litre M3 is a legitimate Ferrari killer which will seat four in comfort and can be driven daily. Dinan must be given credit for accomplishing the difficult task of making one of Munich's finest even better.

        Nearly twenty years after work on the first generation M3 began, it still holds its own remarkably well against the supercars of Y2K. This car is definitely not an outdated dinosaur like so much other eighties technology. E30 M3s are still winning club races, thwarting the newer E36 M3s. That the M3 has stood the test of time speaks volumes for BMW's original design, and maybe explains why the car was so dominant in its day. And as for Dinan, they say they are dedicated to one overriding goal "to develop the fastest, best handling, street legal BMWs available anywhere" - it would seem they most certainly are!
        Old School

        Comment


        • #5
          dolate motosport runs 2.8 cars sucessfully (racing) with massive n/a power.

          Comment


          • #6
            The stroked 2.5 Dinan motor supposedly broke soon after the new owner got the car.

            Much schepticism has been directed towards Dinan's dyno figures. Apparently they are claiming torquer figures that others cannot duplicate on their dynos. Not even close. The motor uses an E2 cam which is pretty mild too, and offered at above list price. No head work. It probably is very torquey down low, but not as much as claimed at peak. There are a few places that make custom cranks for S14s...roughly $2-3000...Crower comes to mind and there is another place too.

            Stan

            Comment


            • #7
              so who has a 2.6?

              Dick Chiang @ Dynospotracing 408-271-9800

              Dick is VERY knowledgeable about the S14 and specifically has a 2.6 that is very finely tuned.

              Cal him, he'll chat you up about the engine.

              Eric

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: look at this site...

                Originally posted by ///MBaller
                http://www.bmwclassics.freewire.co.uk/crazy/index.html


                To most, in the year two thousand, the technology of the eighties seems antiquated. It was in the early eighties that the M3 concept was born. BMW needed a car to compete in the European Touring Car Championships, and in order to do so at least five thousand road going versions of the race car had to be produced. The three series was the most highly produced model of the Munich manufacturer's line up; so it was decided that it would be the platform upon which the future legend was to be built. BMW could never have imagined how successful the first generation M3 would be - it became the most successful touring car ever.

                Upon strapping yourself into an E30 M3 today, the car hardly feels like an antique. The first generation M3 may not be as civilized as the second generation E36 M3, but it offers far more driver involvement and is an absolute blast to drive.

                This particular M3 has a bit more kick to it, thanks to some extensive work by Dinan.

                The car began its life being sold to a member of the German consulate, and shortly after made its way into the hands of a former F14 pilot, to whom ridiculous speeds had been a way of life. This poor innocent M3 wasn't to remain in its stock form for long. The car began its metamorphosis with the usual modifications - new chip, evolution cam gear, new springs and shocks, all from Dinan.

                Speed is like an addiction. Once you get hooked, you always want more. In mid 1992 this M3 took an eighteen month break from life on the roads of Northern California and spent the time at Dinan, undergoing an extensive buildup. At that time Dinan was only offering a 2.5 litre engine for the M3, producing 245 horsepower and 234 ft/lb of torque; or a turbocharged engine, delivering 323 horsepower and 324 ft/lb of torque. The former was unable to supply the power necessary to turn the M3 into something that could compete with the thrill of an F14; the latter incorporated a turbo that was arguably, too large for this application, creating excessive lag. Dinan was given the task of producing an immensely powerful, yet immediately responsive engine. This car is the product of their efforts.

                In order to build an engine more powerful than the peaky standard M3 unit (code S14), there was a simple solution - more displacement...and so to work on a 2.6 litre engine:

                The bore was increased to 94.6mm, equivalent to the 2.5 litre motor. To achieve another tenth of a litre the stroke was increased to 92mm. In order to extend the stroke to this length, a custom crankshaft was ground from a solid piece of billet steel, this took five months to produce. The rods were replaced with racing titanium units, and the pistons were replaced with Dinan high performance pistons and rings. In addition to internal modifications, new performance software was installed via a replacement chip. Cam timing was optimised with custom cam sprockets allowing the advantage of the increased displacement to be fully realised.

                Induction is via a large K&N filter with exhaust gases being expelled into the stock header. These then pass through a Supersprint centre resonator and exit through a Hartge muffler. The engine thus produced 282 horsepower and 267 ft/lb of torque. As if this wasn't enough, a new intake camshaft was added - extracting a further 10 horsepower and moving the peak torque to a lower rpm.

                With all of this extra power there was a need for additional modifications beyond the Dinan Stage I Suspension components that were already installed. Dinan's Stage III Suspension was therefore installed, adding thicker front and rear sway bars along with a set of camber plates. The rear springs were also custom-made by Dinan, differing slightly from those normally included with the kit; thus avoiding the rear of the car sitting too low. Dinan's lightweight, three-piece, 17x8.5 inch wheels were installed at all four corners, wrapped in 245/40 ZR rubber. After this long stay at Dinan the car was returned to the road - now it was time to see how it matched up to an F14!

                Is this car capable of scaring an F14 pilot? Probably not. But is an F14 pilot at the wheel capable of terrifying the passenger? An emphatic yes would be the answer based on my personal experience! It took one ride in the car for me to know that I had to have one. It seemed things were going my way that day, for it just so happened that the car was for sale... and I bought it!

                After a couple of months in the driver's seat, the car isn't quite so terrifying. Stomping on the accelerator still induces thrills best reserved for a race track. In stock form, the M3 has the performance to back up its muscular looks, but after its transformation this 1988 M3 has far surpassed all of my expectations. 0-60 mph is accomplished in the high four second range, enabling it to keep up with a C5 Corvette or a Ferrari F355. The car pulls hard all the way to its 8,000 rpm limit. Handling seems almost limitless as the tyres stick like glue through corners, the car acting in very predictable manner.

                Most people's first complaint about the E30 M3 is its lack of torque, making the car less than a joy to drive in traffic. With an approximate increase of 50% in both horsepower and torque, arriving at about the same rpm as stock, the Dinan M3 is very tractable in stop and go traffic - or just about anywhere else for that matter. The car is at home cruising at high speeds on the freeway, however due to the wide tyres it may wander, following grooved surfaces on the road. Where this car really shines is on the back roads where it can be pushed. Speed limits not only beg to be broken, but doubled or even tripled, the car remaining incredibly poised. Handling is superb with amazing balance, turn in and wonderful feedback. The car speaks to the driver as the two become one, linked through the car's controls. Power is on demand - at any rpm. For a high output four cylinder engine flexibility is incredible, although things become very entertaining from 4,000 rpm upwards!

                The transformation of this M3 into a true supercar is accompanied by quite a hefty price tag:

                The Stage II 2.6 litre stroker motor comes in at $12,860 for the short block.

                $999 for the intake cam, plus 29+ hours of labour, and a $5,500 refundable core deposit.

                The Stage III Suspension System is available for either $1,451 or $1,639 depending on the shock absorbers used, plus the cost of 11.5 hours of labour.

                In all, the receipts for the work done to this beast of a BMW add up to about ... (wait for it - Ed)... $80,000!

                However, $11,000 of this total amount was squandered on the stereo which is capable of breaking all the windows in the car with its 3,000 watt output.

                The Dinan 2.6 litre M3 is a legitimate Ferrari killer which will seat four in comfort and can be driven daily. Dinan must be given credit for accomplishing the difficult task of making one of Munich's finest even better.

                Nearly twenty years after work on the first generation M3 began, it still holds its own remarkably well against the supercars of Y2K. This car is definitely not an outdated dinosaur like so much other eighties technology. E30 M3s are still winning club races, thwarting the newer E36 M3s. That the M3 has stood the test of time speaks volumes for BMW's original design, and maybe explains why the car was so dominant in its day. And as for Dinan, they say they are dedicated to one overriding goal "to develop the fastest, best handling, street legal BMWs available anywhere" - it would seem they most certainly are!
                Was the car in this article white with tan interior
                N54B30
                F20C
                S14B26
                M20B25
                M20B25
                M20B27

                Comment


                • #9
                  There was a thread on 2.9 strokers a little while back. The guy down the street from me does 2.6 liter engines, I thin he goes 96 90 bore stroke or something like that. They use all the stock evo3 parts except they bore it out a little bit more. I think thats all there is to a 2.6. The link to the thread is below.
                  http://www.s14.net/forums/showthread...&highlight=2.9
                  Also an interesting one about using a 90mm Cosworth crank to achieve 2.6 liters. Cosworth made great stuff before the blue oval swallowed them up and everyone knows that the blue oval is to quality what rat poison is to rats.
                  http://www.s14.net/forums/showthread...&highlight=2.9
                  Here is the math for the 2.6 posted by somebody else in another thread but copied and pasted by me.
                  90mm throw * 95mm pistons = 2.552 Ltr surely? Is this _really_ a 2.6?
                  1986 Mercedes 190e 2.3-16 Cosworth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JNJ-qVPBkU

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My s14 vill have 95mm bore and 94mm stroke witin a few weeks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by yngve
                      My s14 vill have 95mm bore and 94mm stroke witin a few weeks
                      What crank are using? How about rods? I am becoming more and more interested in doing this sort of setup. Let me know how you like and some specs about, such as redline, top end power, low and mid torque, street driveability, reliability and things of that nature.
                      1986 Mercedes 190e 2.3-16 Cosworth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JNJ-qVPBkU

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I got the crank from kÝhler racing, rods are H profile 144mm( http://www.stenparnermotor.se/default.aspx?NodeId=42 ) .. Cr 12-1.. Redline are problably gona be somwhere around 8500rpm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          what kind of power do you expect?
                          1986 Mercedes 190e 2.3-16 Cosworth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JNJ-qVPBkU

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            And I can add that 94mm are max stroke, without reducing big end rod/crank dim!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by project86
                              what kind of power do you expect?
                              Difficult to tell, but I do expect this to be a relayable street/track day engine

                              Comment

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