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  • coolant and rain=bad for traction

    this is what led to car spiining off road- a bolt backed out that was holding the alternator adjustment bracket. belt came off and the car started to over heat. I noticed this and stopped the car to check out what was going on. The car had already gotten hot enough to spew coolant all over under the car. I limped it home with no belt and fixed it. So the next day it was raining and I was going to work. made it about a block, and shifting around a turn into second the car was thrown into a spin and I went into a curb backwards. Now I have a nice big dent in my rim and a bent trailing arm or bent something, The wheel has severe toe in and some other crazy angles. So going to get under there and see what I can findout. Not driving it again in fear of hurting something. I really need 2 cars at this rate:(
    1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
    1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

  • #2
    So I bent my sub-frame, rear left trailing arm and rim. I have located the parts and am now in a position of having to decide how I want to go about doing it. I can either try and tackle this job myself or have it done for $1000. In that $1000 quote he is including having the exhaust hangers cut off and re-welded on the new sub frame and installing new sub frame mounts. Now I know I will have to have the new wheel bearing pressed on, and I imagine removing the old spindle and hub parts might require outside assistance. Other than that everything else looks pretty straight forward. So who has done this before and how much of a pita job is it. Also what rear sub-frame mounts would you guy’s recommend.

    Thanks in advance for the help
    1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
    1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

    Comment


    • #3
      if you plan on taking a few weekends and taking your time. Cleaning everything up real nice and replacing all the necessary parts it shouldn't be that bad. I've had my rear subframe out and it took me a couple of weeks, but I work slow, and it was winter time.

      The hardest part is getting the driveshaft off the diff, those bolts were tight as hell. And lining the diff up with the upper mounting plate when I reinstalled it was a pain the ass too. Other than that it was a lot of tight bolts and lying on your back, but really not that difficult.

      Plus it gives you a chance to replace a lot of bushings, which is really why I did it in the first place

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        DIY, imo.

        If the rear subframe is non M3, have the mounts for the trailing arms ground off and weld on a set that allows for the rotation of eccentric style bushings for more camber and toe adjustment.
        Have the rear swaybar tabs on the subframe reinforced.
        use the labor savings for upgrades or other maintenance.
        m

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        • #5
          Ouch,
          Sorry, I missed this thread when you first posted. that's a bummer.

          Don't do this job yourself if you're just trying to save a buck. Rear sub frame and trailing arm replacement is not for the faint of heart. But it is a totally doable as a DIY project. I recommend doing it yourself, but only if all of these are true:
          A. You have good mechanical skills
          B. You are a patient person who likes to do things right
          C. You truly love your car
          D. You want to learn something

          Comment


          • #6
            i'm with Mick, patience is very necessary with this project.

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            • #7
              "If the rear subframe is non M3, have the mounts for the trailing arms ground off and weld on a set that allows for the rotation of eccentric style bushings for more camber and toe adjustment."

              I am pretty sure the subframe I have lined up is a non m3 part, so in addition to changing the location of exhaust hangers I also have to have this done. Or is this something that is an upgrade that I might as well have done while it is all apart. I have heard of a subframe dinan makes that allows for those type of adjustments. so before I get into this is there anymore words from the wise in regards to things I should be watching out for or other things that need to be done. also not to drag this on but what subframe mounts do you guys recomend for a car that lives in a bumpy area but will be visiting the track every so often. thanks for the help so far.
              1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
              1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

              Comment


              • #8
                So I located a new m3 specific sub frame and trailing arm and Heading up to Sacramento on Thurs to pick it all up. Now it is time for me to start pulling this rear end off. Any words from the wise before I do this as to things I should watch out for, tips and/or tricks. It all looks pretty simple, but seeing how I have never been this far into a car before it is just a bit intimidating. Also wondering your guys take on the group N mounts. At the moment I am in the process of ordering all new rubber anything that moves and the group n stuff is expensive but looks like it would be worth the extra cash. Any other things I shoulod be doing while it is down?
                1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
                1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

                Comment


                • #9
                  oh come on, someone has to have some information.
                  1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
                  1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wouldn't do it without a Koala CD. Also the gruppe N stuff is generally too stiff and too expensive. Usually the M3 or e28 M5 will suffice. At least that's true for trans and motor mounts. I'm not sure about the subframe mounts.

                    EDIT: I found these urethane rear subframe mounts from Ireland Engineering https://secure3.nexternal.com/shared...RowID=406&All=

                    Link may not work but they are there. $40
                    Last edited by AlpineRunner; 12-15-2004, 06:59 PM.
                    "It is needless to say that self-propelling vehicles, like other machines, will never do as much for one who does not understand them as for one who does."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by L.B.R///M3
                      "If the rear subframe is non M3, have the mounts for the trailing arms ground off and weld on a set that allows for the rotation of eccentric style bushings for more camber and toe adjustment."

                      I am pretty sure the subframe I have lined up is a non m3 part, so in addition to changing the location of exhaust hangers I also have to have this done. Or is this something that is an upgrade that I might as well have done while it is all apart. I have heard of a subframe dinan makes that allows for those type of adjustments. so before I get into this is there anymore words from the wise in regards to things I should be watching out for or other things that need to be done. also not to drag this on but what subframe mounts do you guys recomend for a car that lives in a bumpy area but will be visiting the track every so often. thanks for the help so far.
                      Once the rear subframe has been removed from the car, and the trailing arms are off, You'll be able to grind off the tabs that the mounting bolts for the trailing arms pass thru.
                      Not having done this mod myself, I believe just the inner tabs are ground off and tabs that are designed to accept eccentric bolts are welded in.(I'll look for the link).
                      Or use the Kmac rear camber compensating kit

                      BUY a Brass hammer and Punch.
                      I've had the subframe off for rear suspension bushings on a friend's car.
                      Make sure you saturate all fasteners with a rust penetrant(not WD40) to aid removal of fasteners.
                      Exhaust from header flange back removed.
                      Mark the diff input/driveshaft mating relationship if your driveline is nice and smooth.

                      You'll need a narrow chisel or file down a screwdriver blade in order to remove the locking tabs of the large axle nuts.



                      You'll need the rear end jacked up with brakes applied by a helper on order to loosen and remove the axle nuts and the inner CV joint bolts.
                      Remove ABS sensors.
                      Put the big axle nuts on backwards and run them in a little way but not tight.
                      Remove driveshafts by undoing the inner CV bolts all the way.
                      Now use brass hammer and punch to hammer the driveshaft backwards, till it can move without having to beat on it too hard.
                      Remove axle nut and use the brass stuff to hammer out.
                      Once done with that, you need the car high and level.
                      Unhook speedo drive and remove diff.
                      Be very carefull as the car will tend to shift it's weight onto the right front corner as the rear half gets light. It is bizarre(the slanted block/heavy head), so If you can bias the front higher than the rear it will be more stable.
                      Once the rear subframe attachments are all loose you may or may not find that the subframe still has a death grip to the body via the inner metal sleeves of the two large bushings. You need to get really vicious rocking the subframe in order to break the bond, which is why most of the exhaust needs to be removed.
                      You'll need some method to catch the subframe(not your or your bud's bod) in case it decides to pop loose .
                      If you track the car frequently use upgraded stuff, but most of our cars have over 100K on 'em so stock can't be all bad.
                      m
                      Last edited by Mmark; 12-16-2004, 02:40 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        rear subframe, new trailing arm, new wheel bearings
                        left and right. id get a new subframe not used.
                        so if you can buy it new, why get anything other than
                        an M3 subframe? also check the drive axle. I did
                        something like you did before when I hopped
                        a curb at major speed. I broke the same stuff and also
                        replaced the drive axles.

                        but more importantly, since you overheated the motor,
                        you may have warped the head. you should have never
                        continued to drive. you need to kick yourself in the
                        ass twice for that. hopefully you are lucky...

                        John

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          First off thanks for the advice so far you guys rock!
                          Yes John I know I should have not driven it but when I say "limp it home" I truly meant it. With the hood open and any chance I could get to turn the car off and coast making sure never to get it above 2000rpm. So say I did warp the head, now what could I do to check this out. Would compression numbers be way low? leak down test?

                          The sub frame and trailing arm I now have is off of an 89 m3 up in Sacramento from Bav auto recyclers. They have a warranty on all items sold so if there is in fact anything wrong with it I can return the product for a full refund. Also ordered the Ireland Engineering urethane street sub frame mounts and the k mac eccentric trailing arm bushings. I would like to do the tranny and engine mounts while I am under there but cannot decide on what to use so that might have to wait. Will get some pics of the progress soon.

                          Thanks again for the advice
                          1988 E30 M3 2.3(sold)
                          1988 Celica alltrac turbo (on its way to 300hp)

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