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  • E30 M3 minor rust repair

    Took my M3 off the road a few months back to do some
    rust repairs and started a thread in some other forums,
    never got around to posting it up here, so here goes.

    Bought the car in England a couple of years ago now,
    despite the reg plate being 1990 it's actually one of the early M3's (1986).
    It's a 195bhp with the cat and this is how it looked when I first got it.



    Haven't had much time to do a lot with it in the few years since buying
    it apart from some wheels and routine service work. This is how she looked
    before taking off the road.



    Unfortunately although she looks reasonably clean in the pic's the old saying comes to mind
    "good from afar but far from good", reason being the dreaded rust had kicked in and was
    starting to munch it's way through the chassis. Also there was quite a few dings around
    the body and the front is severly stone chipped for some reason











    the most noticeable of the rust was on the rear arches where it would appear
    somewhere during it's life the rear arches were rolled to accommodate larger wheels
    and tyres and poorly done..





    So we set about getting the car ready for some small rust repairs....



















    with the amount of stuff coming out of the bm, shelf space was starting to get scarce
    so the poor escort has to double up as a fitted wardrobe for the time being ....





    right ready to begin......


    As mentioned the main reason for taking the car off the road was
    the rust on the rear arches, but that was far from the least of the
    rust problems. First up was some rust on the drivers side of the boot
    under where the rubber seal sits.....



    a few years after the car rolled off the production line the rear end
    had an unfortunate coming together with a solid object, otherwise
    known as a tank slapper. The previous owner had provided all the original
    receipts for the main dealer repairs at the time , which showed that it
    had a rear drivers side section of the quarter panel changed. Sure enough
    real oem confirmed that a replacement section of the rear quarters were
    available, and I have to admit that whoever done the repair done it well
    at the time, I certainly couldn't have done better. Unfortunately the ravages of
    time(17years) and salty water has taken it's toll on the repair
    and while the main part of the repair (the face of the quarter panel) is
    still perfect, the sections under the boot lid and under the bumper have
    rusted badly.

    So, first thing is to clean away the paint and see how much metal needs
    to come out.....



    mark up and cut out the rotten area.....





    and then make up a replacement section from some shiny new sheet
    steel...



    and weld it in........



    i'm not gifted enough to form and weld in the repairs seemless with the
    original panel so the patches are welded in slightly below the surface level
    to allow for a small skim of filler to blend the repairs.

    next up was a small hole in the bulkhead under the battery tray about the size
    of a cue tip which when wire brushed with the angle grinder opened
    up to reveal itself to be a little larger......



    same story again, mark, cut out, make cardboard template, transfer to
    metal, tack in place, weld up, sand down welds and apply primer to bare
    metal.......



    after that it was on to the windscreen scuttle which on the whole was
    blemish free, apart from a section on the passenger side at the drain
    hole....



    when wire brushed back it was mostly just surface rust, but as access to
    view the far side of the panel was poor it was decided to play safe and
    cut out and replace.......







    next up the foot wells, having had the carpets out a year ago as a result
    of a heater matrix leak I was reasonably confident that she wasn't a
    Flintstone mobile and that the floors were still fairly well intact.
    And sure enough she still looked presentable from the inside.....





    but some routing around underneath revealed some less than pristine
    metal, first up was the front of the drivers side inner sill panel, seen here
    with the spot welds drilled and section nicked for removal.....





    then it was on to the passenger side which was a little more involved.
    At some stage the seamsealer had given way around the front jacking
    box and allowed the elements in on top of the box section. The box
    section was finished......



    but thankfully it hadn't taken to much of the floor with it. Again to be
    safe anywhere that had signs of even slight surface rust was cut
    to make way for new metal......






  • #2
    after that it was back again to that rear quarter panel repair and the
    rusted section hidden behind the back bumper. Surprisingly we didn't
    have to wait for the wire brush to find out the extent of the rust here....





    again cut out all that was coloured that expensive shade of browny
    orange...



    and make up some new pieces to fill up the holes.....



    don't mind admitting this one took a few goes to get the bends right...







    and thats about where it's up to now. Still plenty of rust to go and
    still have to figure out what way to go at the rear arches. Loads of
    stuff planed for the rebuild but we'll save that for down the line,
    next installment could be fun though, as we attempt to swap a perfectly
    good sun roof for a freshly purchased non sunroof roof.....





    will she end up a soft top??

    Comment


    • #3
      we managed to get some progress done since the last post, the main
      item being the attempt to change the roof. When originally setting out to
      look for an M3 in the begining I had wanted one without a sunroof
      but this proved all but impossible to find at the time so instead I settled for
      a car with one. (which I bought off a member on here, howya steve if your
      still tuned in!). So when planning this rebuild I decided that if so much work
      was going to be done to the shell, changing the roof wouldn't add much more
      effort, plus it'd get rid of a nice bit of weight to.
      So after buying the roof skin from the local dealer, which is the same skin
      as any other e30, we set about seeing what was involved in changing it.
      From studying the parts diagrams it appeared that the rear roof addition
      could be removed by drilling some spot welds to get access to the roof below
      it.....




      however when we started to clean around this panel to reveal the spot
      welds that would have to be drilled we discovered that not only was the
      panel a bit bigger than we had expected but it was also brazed in
      places (i've outlined the panel in red to try and show a bit clearer what is
      all one panel)........



      and it continued all the way over to the other side.......



      we hadn't minded the taughts of drilling out the spot welds around the
      windscreen lip and the ones across the roof, but, in having to heat the panel
      up to remove the braze and then removing the whole section across the
      parcel shelf we were fairly sure we'd f**k the panel up,
      which takes on a little more significance when your told the panel is no
      longer available to buy. So instead we decided to do it like this.

      first up cut out the lower section of the sunroof tray.....





      which allows a good view of the brace that runs across the roof right
      behind the sunroof opening. This had to stay, as cutting this out leaves
      the roof very very flexible.
      next up cut out the roof behind this brace......



      which allows better access to carefully trim the metal off the brace.....



      the sidewalls of the sunroof tray were still stuck to the brace and while
      they at first glance look as if they are just bonded to it......



      they are in fact spot welded to it.......



      so drill the spot welds and carefully prise it free....



      next up, the roof skin at the rear of the sunroof hole rolls in around
      this brace.....



      and the lip was buffed with the angle grinder untill the lip could be broken off without doing any damage to the brace. With everything now disconected underneath from the brace all that remained was to remove
      the roof skin from above it. Two carefull cuts......



      and then peal the skin off.....



      revealing the roof brace....



      with that done a few more carefull cuts were made to remove the side bits
      of the roof skin.....



      the reason why we needed to be carefull with the cuts was the roof
      skeleton was only a few mm below the roof skin and we didn't want to
      touch it.





      with the skin cut down to the drain gutters on the side of the roof, these
      were then buffed down with the angle grider to the flat mating surface,
      ready for the new skin to sit on top (sorry lost the pic).
      The last remaining piece of skin was the front section which involved
      drilling out the spot welds around the windscreen lip and cutting it off....





      the original roof is brazed on at the top of the front windscreen pillars
      and this was removed by getting out the gas bottles and melting the braze
      again to allow the last little bit of skin to be pulled off.....



      after stopping for a brief smoke and whats reffered to in medical terms
      as a sh*te attack when the realisation kicked in that I'd just cut a
      perfectly good roof off my M3 , :eek: we moved on swiftly.

      remove the new roof from it's fancy crate.....



      and then offer up the roof to see how it fits. As said earlier we had decided not
      to remove the rear panel which concealed a couple of inches
      of the roof skin and instead decided to cut and weld the roof here instead.
      First up mark the roof to trim off the overhang....



      and then refit the roof skin to see if we'd measured right.....



      thankfully we did, and the roof sat nicely in place as we had left an inch
      of the old skin protruding out and had joggled this down allowing the
      new roof to sit on top of it......



      next up was to trim the "A" pillar joins and get them sitting right.....



      a couple of laps around the car buffing down metal to ensure the roof
      was sitting snuggly before welding started......



      and then we started welding at the rear first working our way forward,
      after each weld was done it was quickly quenched with a wet rag to try
      stop the heat from soaking into the roof skin and warping it.....



      ideally it would have been nice to use a spot welder for this but we don't
      have one and after pricing a decent one decided that it wasn't worth
      buying one just for this job, so mig it is.....



      the nice part about this run of welds is that theres a nice little brace
      that sits on the roof which conceals everything.....



      we then moved on to the sides, on the original roof the gutters appear to
      be continously roll welded, I've no idea whats required to replicate this
      and hassard a guess that the equipment required would cost the same if
      not more than the spot welder, so, mig welder at the ready we ran a
      bead of weld an inch long every few inches........



      and buffed them down flush when finished so the black rail trim pieces
      will fit back over.......



      next up was drill and plug weld around the front windscreen lip.....





      and finally braze up the "A" pillar joints.....



      and hey presto, no sunroof.....





      thank f**k thats done, not that we were ever nervous of making a balls
      of it you understand :mad:





      hope to tackle the rear arches next.

      Comment


      • #4
        got a bit more done since last post.
        First up was to sort out the battery box on the passenger side.
        Thankfully it wasn't as bad as the other side, but it was still far from
        perfect, that'd be far to easy.....




        when cleaned up fully it wasn't to big....



        but it had also spread to the battery box floor aswell....



        so out with the grinder....





        and make up the replacement pieces, weld in and grind down neat.....



        next up was a little bubble just above this, which when paint stripped
        revealed this.....



        no idea how that one started? anywho, it wasn't too bad from the inside....



        but with the outside wire brushed you could see it had to go....



        so, cut out....



        make up piece and weld in and clean up.....



        was shifting along at a nice pace at this stage and could see only one
        more little piece on this section, lovely, get this finished tonight....



        aaah fu*k.....



        the rust had actually started from the inside wheel arch skin and spread
        to the outer panel as they run quite close together......



        so, all together now.... cut



        fabricate.... (like that word?, sounds real fancy for beating the shit out
        of a piece of steel till it roughly resembles the bit you hacked off)



        fab and weld inner skin (it's now "fab" instead of fabricate, with the
        amount of bloody rust popin up on this thing i'm going to be typing that
        word alot).....



        not getting to carried away cleaning the welds flush on this one, it's
        behind the bumper and behind the bumper bracket.....





        if someone sees it, it should mean i've just run over them, in which case
        they're unlikely to tell anybody about it.

        right enough of that micky mouse crap, time to start hackin the arch off.
        With the paint stripped off you could see how far the rust had spread up....



        and although the main face of the arch hadn't holed through with the rust,
        the lip inside when bent back down from the ""PROFESSIONAL"" arch
        rolling job, looked to be totally shot to bits.....



        reckoned that since the outside skin was this bad most probably the inner
        skin would be shite too and both would probably need cutting back. I then
        realised with both bits going to be cut away I was going to need a template
        of some sort to help form the new arch metal in to the same shape. So
        before cutting anything I bent up and cut a bit of mdf to act as a guide....





        with that done it was time to mark up what had to go.....



        and then chop it out to reveal a pleasant suprise....



        the inner skin was untouched by the brown pox, even the lip cleaned up
        with a slight wire brush, marvelous, see that, if this was an Italian car the
        bloody axle probably would have fell out on that last cut. These Germans
        know what their at.

        anywho, now that you could see what need to be replaced we could get on
        with making up the replacement piece.
        Draw up a piece from the bit that was cut off....



        leaving 10mm above the piece to tuck in behind the original skin, and
        20mm below the piece to roll under for the arch lip....



        we picked up this tool a few years ago and it's fairly handy for pieces
        like this, think it's called a "joggler", probably wrong though, don't blame
        me if they start laughing at ya when you ask for one down the tool shop.....



        and when you look at it up close you can see the teeth which bends the
        metal are shaped to bend it so the new piece runs up behind the
        original piece.....



        like so.....



        next was to cut a few slits in it to allow the 90 degree bend for the lip on
        the bottom of the arch....



        and after studying the other arch you could see that the bend wasn't a
        sharp 90degree but a little curved, so we made a little dolly piece to
        bend the metal over....



        and then bent it piece by piece......





        which left it looking like this....



        the last thing to do was drill a few holes in the lip so it could be plug
        welded to the inner arch lip....



        and then start the long process of weldin it in, bit by bit.....



        spot by spot, till it's one continuous line of weld.....



        and when it's finished grind the welds down smooth....



        and weld the two lips together and all the little slits....



        it's not 100% perfect, up close you can see where metals been added in,
        nothing a light skim of filler won't hide though, isopon, the life blood of
        many a bodger.

        Comment


        • #5
          with that done there was just a little piece at the back of the arch which
          was left....





          time to move inside the wheel arch then, on the whole the main metal work
          looked ok in there, but anywhere there was a bracket or something
          sticking out had caught the pox, such as this little lad which supports
          the plastic wheel arch liner....



          when viewed from the inside it had actually holed through the panel....



          so off with the bracket and cut.....



          copy and paste....



          bracket it's self wasn't to bad and cleaned up grand to go back on again...







          next up was the little cover that runs over the fuel tank breather pipes
          in the arch and if the other parts of the shell had caught the pox this bit had
          contracted the plague. Heres what it should look like.....



          and here's what's left intact of the old one once removed, the differences
          are quite subtle at first glance, but those with a keen eye should be able
          to tell the two apart....



          unfortunately while the cover was an easy swap, the bit's the cover rested
          against and had got infected took a little more effort.....

















          had hoped this next bit would be available from the dealer as a replacement
          panel.....







          but after checking with realoem and then the dealer it appears that the
          shock tower pictured only comes with the whole inner wheel arch liner.
          So she'll get the cut and paste job to.

          And thats where we're at at the moment, have to go now as it's taken
          that long to post this up the fu*kin cars probably started rusting again.....



          .

          Comment


          • #6
            Been a while since the last update, reason being we've had some
            engine woe's, a bit hard to understand when your cars just a bare shell,
            but alas it was not the M3 engine that was the cause for grief. Instead it
            was the turn of the 325 I bought to get me around while the M was off
            the road that decided it was time she had some attention too.
            For a while now I've been the proud owner of an environmentally
            friendly "biofuel" 325. She run's on both petrol and water, but when
            she started to use more water than petrol there was no avoiding it any
            longer. Work had to pause on the M to sort the head gasket on the 325.




            Thankfully the few gaskets needed for the 325 didn't amount to much and
            the job was a quick one, however the other half of Xworks motorsport
            didn't quite fair out quite so lucky when his engine decided to let go at the
            same time. It took a lot more funds and effort to get this kitten purring
            again....





            with the engine woe's out of the way we were able to return to the
            BM again and something we've been meaning to get around to for a few
            years now. All the shells we've worked on in the past we've usually
            rolled over on to some old tires to gain access to underneath, and while
            this has worked ok, it's not very elegant and an ability to hold a shell at
            a different angle while working on it can be very helpful. So, some box,
            angle, tube, channel and a pair of housed bearings led to the creation
            of this....











            the spit is designed for the weight of a bare shell and it can be
            rotated with one hand. Both front and back stands are identical, bar
            the locking mechanism welded to the rear stand to hold the shell
            at the desired angle. We used an automatic driveplate as it had a circle
            of holes allready in it and saved us having to make up and dill a plate.





            the uprights of the spit were made just tall enough to rotate the
            shell 90 degrees as seen below....



            it has worked out very handy and both of us agreed we should have
            made one years ago, especially when the metal and bearings needed to
            make it only costed around 140.



            one slight modification we made to it when up and running was the
            addition of 2 outriggers front and back. As we found the shell had an
            irritating habit of rocking ever so slightly back and forward when you
            were sanding or wire brushing along the axis of the spit. The outriggers
            cured this.







            if anyone tuned in decides they're going to build one for themselves
            in the future I've drawn up a few measurements in the link below that
            may help.[/color]

            http://www.xworksmotorsport.com/m3%2...%20%282%29.JPG

            [color=white] with the spit finished it was back to the shell and where we left off
            last post. The passenger side rear shock tower. As mentioned earlier
            the shock tower isn't available as a separate piece, only as a part of the
            whole wheel arch inner skin. So after a cut and paste this was the end
            result......



            the only thing left to finish in this arch was a small bracket at the top
            of it, which was fairly well gone.....



            thankfully with the bracket removed it hadn't done much damage to
            the arch skin....



            the bracket however was kaput....



            so make a new bracket.....



            and repair the arch skin before rewelding the bracket left it looking
            fine again....



            After this it was on to the arch the other side, starting again with
            the shock tower. This time the actual tower itself was fine, but instead
            the arch skin right behind it had let go.....



            2 choices, either crawl into the boot and cut and repair the skin from
            in there, or, cut a piece of the shock tower out of the way to do the repair
            from the outside.....



            innar skin repair piece.....



            welded.....



            shock tower piece remade and rewelded.....



            cleaned up and a lick of primer......



            After that it was on to the arch itself. Thankfully it wasn't as bad as
            the far side when cleaned up.....



            two small sections needed replacing......

























            Comment


            • #7
              then on to the lip itself. Again the outer lip once unrolled was
              wasted but the innar lip was fine once wire brushed.......



              so new lip made up and clamped in ready for welding.......







              next up, further down the arch where the side skirt sits over.
              When wire brushed up it looked ropey......



              So off it came to reveal the source of the problem, the innar skin



              so off it came too.....



              inner piece made first......











              and then the outer piece.......







              next up one of the holes on the sill where the side skirt clips
              go through was looking the worse for ware......



              before cutting it out time was taken to make a template of the
              holes position. The last thing you want to have to do when reassembling
              a freshly painted car is to have to file or redrill new holes in the nice
              paintwork. So a few bits of tape as markers and a bit of cardboard with
              the holes position marked on it......



              with the piece cut out it now became a bit awkward to offer up and
              trim the new piece as there is no access to the inside of the sill. A nail
              came to the rescue.....







              and then offer up the template back into position to get the exact
              position of the hole.....





              next a few more brackets on the outside of the spare wheel well
              needed replacing.....









              after which a few brackets were removed from the engine bay that
              won't be needed down the line......









              and finally a modification which probably won't be to everyone's
              tastes. When I bought the car it had a nice set of rear speakers sitting
              on the rear parcel shelf, but, the sound was poor because of no real
              box to enclose them in the parcel shelf.



              So...... (lovers of originality look away now!)




















              and thats about it for now, thankfully the end of the rust repair is
              near, which means it's nearly time for a 500mile round trip to give the
              shell a bath at the premises of SPL.....
              http://www.surfaceprocessing.co.uk/for-cars.html




              .

              Comment


              • #8
                Not a huge update tonight as the car's been away for most of the
                time since the last post, however it is back now and it's 101% rust free!
                But before we get to that I'll start where I finished off last update,
                there was a few small rust repairs to finish before departure....

                the rear tail light panel seems to be a week point on e30's for rust
                and since mine had all the other common rust points present it
                came as no surprise that I had the full matching set...

                drivers side tail light section revealed...



                magnified for those who frequent to many porn sites...



                and some more underneath just to complicate things...



                chop, measure, template, offer up, curse, bin, measure again, offer up...



                magic wand...



                arc eye...



                grinder spark burns...



                and on to underneath...









                and then on to the passenger side...



                and underneath of coarse...



                and for whats hopefully the final time on this shell,
                chop...



                template...



                and paste...



                and clean...



                and underneath...









                end of patches...



                although now we had to remove every grommet and plug from the
                shell in preparation for dipping...



                After this was done we loaded up the shell on the trailer and headed for
                the boat, 9 hours later we were at the front doors of SPL in Dudley
                Birmingham, where we left the shell and returned home. Well I say home,
                but that wasn't untill after some twat overturned a concrete truck on the
                A55 and forced us to wait 8 hours in Hollyhead for the next boat.
                Beautiful place Hollyhead, loads to do. Moving on.




                .

                Comment


                • #9
                  4 weeks later came the call from SPL to say the shell was ready for
                  collection. We rigged up van and trailer and headed off again like two
                  little kiddies off to visit father christmas. Below is the pictures of what
                  we brought home. The first 2 pictures are not of my shell, but a member
                  of another forum's car who has kindly let me use them to show what
                  the car looks like mid process, after stripping but before primer dipping...





                  and then the finished article, one 100% rust free shell and panels...


































                  Have to say I'm well happy with the outcome. The dipping process is
                  very good in so far as it reaches every little nook and cranny, no matter
                  what box section or bracket you look in or under it's clean and coated.
                  However there is some small downsides, this is underneath all an
                  industrial process and despite our best efforts to build a jig to keep the
                  shell safe while being moved around while in SPL's care there are some
                  "new" dents in the shell. They are few and small but unfortunately one
                  of them is smack bang in the middle of the new roof skin...



                  frustrating, but thats life I guess.

                  Since the shell's been home I've not had a chance to do much, but first
                  on the list was to give the underneath a very light sanding with 320grit
                  sandpaper to key the surface in preparation fro schultz and painting...





                  that last sentence took 10 seconds to write, the sanding took 2 days, it'll
                  be a while yet before this thing is getting speeding fines.



                  .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry for the delay in updates but unfortunately we had a tough decision
                    to make. With the current recession and global economic
                    downturn we had to do some long hard thinking and in the end both
                    came to the same regrettable decision...
                    It's too f**kin cold to be working out in the garage during december.

                    Alas by mid January the temperature was picking up and the
                    snow had melted away. Before I go any further I'd like to explain
                    that it wasn't to cold for us in the garage, we were concerned that
                    the low temperatures would play havoc with the paints and sealers
                    going on the car next and afraid that the metalwork underneath might
                    be damp and the underbody shultz going on might trap
                    dampness in to the shell. Thats our story and we're sticking with it. :wink:

                    So back to the work, first things first, heat...



                    and then back to where we left off last time, the underneath of
                    the shell was sanded and ready for a good coat of primer.
                    We have used this primer in the past and have found it good. Its
                    Upol P88 and can either be hand painted or thinned out and sprayed.
                    For under the car we went with a good heavy hand painted coat....







                    after this it was time for seam sealer. We used two types of sealer for this,
                    I had 3 quarters of a can of Upol sealer left over from another job which
                    was still good to go and also bought another 2 cans of 3m to finish the job off....







                    in the second picture above you can see the special brush that seam sealer
                    comes with to reproduce factory finish effect. I don't like using that brush
                    so instead you can see in the 1st pic the brush I prefer to use. It's a normal
                    half inch brush with about 1cm cut off the end of the bristles.
                    On the application itself basically you apply the sealer to any panel gap on the
                    underside of the car where water can creep in
                    to where you don't want it....





                    as well as any brackets on the underside of the car, although water
                    getting in to the car isn't a concern here what does happen
                    is water seeps in between the bracket and the floorpan of the car and stays there
                    slowly but surely rotting the surrounding metalwork....







                    with the underneath done it was time to move on and do the inside,
                    the boot and the engine bay.....







                    on the whole the seam sealer was fairly straight forward to put on,
                    if a little time consuming, there was however one b**tard of
                    an area to get to, the compartment underneath the front scuttle panel....



                    I'm pretty sure I got more on me than in there.

                    The next area that needed sealing was along the roof gutters and
                    rear windscreen clip. This will be visible under the final spray job
                    so it needs to be a little neater...







                    so we use this stuff, same principle, it's a seam sealer but instead of brush on
                    it's in a tube and can be squirted a little neater....



                    it can be put on using a normal silicone gun but with the temperatures
                    still a little low the stuff is fairly stubborn in the tube so we used an air gun to apply it.....







                    next job after that was to rebond the roof. When the shell was dipped
                    all sealer and bonder was disolved so it didn't make much sense to bond
                    the roof before dipping, so we done it now....



                    With all that done we could move on to Shultzing the underneath of the shell.
                    Before this started we "masked" off the section off the garage the car was in.
                    This was not so much to stop the Shultz getting on everything, it's a reasonably
                    tidy application, but instead to stop the dust from the sanding which was
                    coming next from getting everywhere. The car itself was masked of for
                    shultzing....









                    and as you may have noticed from some of the earlier pic's all
                    the little threaded nuts and brackets where you don't want the
                    stone gaurd to get were masked up.
                    For the underseal itself we decided to go with the 3m gear
                    thanks to some advice from a member on here RJB6 (thanks Roy).
                    The stuff comes in foil packets and cost 18euro a pack....



                    The other thing needed was the special gun used to apply the stuff, it cost 60 euro....



                    the gun is a little on the expensive side compared to other products guns
                    but the one upside, unlike others, is that the sealer doesn't run through
                    this style of gun so you don't have to clean it out after or worry about it clogging up.
                    The air pressure comes out of the gun and siphons the gue
                    up out of the packet and splatters it on to the shell....



                    Having not used this stuff before I made some "complicated calculations" on how much
                    exactly I would need to do the whole underside and came to the conclusion
                    that 6 packs would be sufficient.....



                    and the result....



                    yeah, 6 packs covered one third of the underneath, f**kin egit
                    so back to the motorfactors again.

                    12 packs later....









                    the finish is sweet, looks more or less identical to the factory stuff....





                    Thats about it for tonight. Have a load more pics online and hope
                    to get them up here tomorrow evening. Heads melted from
                    typing all this crap now, so, till tomorrow.....



                    .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looking good... I dream of doing a tear down and build back up like this. I am mechanical and do not have the body works skills you have at all... I cannot wait to see the finished product!!! Your work is truly inspiring!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        pretty awesome! Subscribed. I desperately want to do a rotisserie resto at some point.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Outstanding thread, one of the best I have ever seen......

                          It sure makes it clear how rust can be "fatal" to a chassis. I cannot imagine what it would have cost to pay a professional to do all that work, and even then there would always be doubts about places where they might have cut corners.... By the time one realized things had not been done "right", it would be years down the road and there would be no recourse. I don't trust anyone that much I'm afraid.....

                          After all that work, the dip priming sure seems like good insurance. In the USA for some reason there are very few places that will do it. I have often wondered, if any other method is used, how one can ensure the metal is protected in dark places where a spray gun will not reach......?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            unreal.....you need a medal mate














                            http://garage.s14power.com/showgalle...08&ppuser=1534

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wow. This kind of work requires a ridiculous amount of motivation, skill, and the patience of a saint. Awesome work!

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